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Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives.
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The technology that’s replacing the green screen
The technology that’s replacing the green screen
5 dager siden
The green screen is a Hollywood staple. Should it be? It’s easy to complain about overreliance on special effects, but for projects that require impossible-to-film environments or have incredibly expensive shots, how do you get the flexibility of green screens without the drawbacks? Charmaine Chan has worked on one of the possible answers. Vox's Phil Edwards spoke to her about her career and how it's at the forefront of a big technological shift. As a compositor for venerable effects house Industrial Light and Magic (ILM), she’s worked on films like The Last Jedi, assembling various digital elements into a beautiful, seamless image. Her job changed on The Mandalorian, one of the first shows to use ILM’s upgrade for the green screen: LED panels that used video game engine technology to place a realistic-looking world behind the actors. It was a huge improvement, because green screens actually have a lot of drawbacks. Removing the green screen is never as quick as visual effects artists would hope. It also casts green light upon the set and actors. Even substitutes for a green screen, like projecting an image onto a screen behind the actor, fail to dynamically respond to camera movements the way they would in the real world. ILM’s solution fixes a lot of those problems, and it also led to creative breakthroughs in which the old Hollywood order of a TV show or movie, in which VFX came last, was suddenly reversed. Now, artists like Charmaine are alongside actors, set designers, and other crew members during filming. That collaboration means that this technology doesn’t just eliminate a screen - it eliminates a creative barrier. Watch the above video to see how it happens. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why American public transit is so bad | 2020 Election
Why American public transit is so bad | 2020 Election
6 dager siden
Most Americans have no choice but to drive. How do we change that? What do you wish the presidential candidates would talk about? vox.com/ElectionVideos In the middle of the 20th century, the US government made a decision that would transform American cities: It built a huge system of interstate highways, many of which went right through the downtowns of its biggest cities. This sealed the country's fate as a car culture, and today we're seeing the results. In most cities, it's extremely difficult to get around without a car, in part due to public transit systems built to serve an outdated commute. And when our politics turn to infrastructure, the government often favors building new roads and highways instead of improving and expanding public transportation. The result is a system that forces more Americans to drive, at the expense of those who rely on public transit. It's also the biggest contributor to our country’s carbon footprint. Fixing that over the long term will require a reimagining of American cities and towns. But there's also a way that, if we wanted to, we could improve American transit systems, and get more people riding them, in a matter of weeks. This video is the seventh in our series on the 2020 election. We aren’t covering the horse race; instead, we want to explain the stakes of the election through the issues that matter most to you. To do that, we want to know what you think the presidential candidates should be talking about. Tell us here: vox.com/ElectionVideos For Jonathan English’s research comparing Canadian and US public transit: www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-08-31/why-is-american-mass-transit-so-bad-it-s-a-long-story For research on suburban commutes from the Brookings Institution’s Adie Tomer, Joseph Kane, and Jennifer S. Vey: www.brookings.edu/interactives/connecting-people-and-places-exploring-new-measures-of-travel-behavior/ For more of Vox’s coverage on public transportation: www.vox.com/2015/8/10/9118199/public-transportation-subway-buses For more historical maps on how the federal highway system transformed cities: iqc.ou.edu/2014/12/12/60yrsmidwest/ Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How America could lose its allies | 2020 Election
How America could lose its allies | 2020 Election
8 dager siden
What is NATO? And why is it still around? What do you wish the presidential candidates would talk about? vox.com/ElectionVideos For 150 years, the US avoided formal alliances. It occasionally went to war -- fighting the War of 1812, the Spanish-American War, and World War I -- but did so without entangling itself in promises to other countries. Then, after World War II, it abruptly changed course, and began to build a network of alliances unlike anything that had come before. Over the next few decades, the US used those alliances to keep countries around the world close, and to fight Soviet expansion, by making a promise that it would go to war if any of its allies were ever attacked. After the Soviet Union fell, the initial purpose of those alliances was gone, but the US recommitted to them, signaling again and again that the central promise of those relationships was still in effect. It kept doing so for the next 25 years. Then the US elected a leader who took America’s global relationships in a new direction. President Trump was skeptical that America’s network of alliances was still beneficial to the US. He began to distance the US from those alliances, raising doubts about whether America would actually follow through on the promise at the core of them if provoked. Some allies moved closer to Russia or China, both of whom had attempted to undermine America’s alliances. Today, the future of those alliances is on the ballot in the US. One of the major presidential candidates in the 2020 election wants to return the US to its former status with its allies; the other finds its decades-old alliances costly and cumbersome. The world is waiting to see which vision Americans prefer. This video is the sixth in our series on the 2020 election. We aren’t covering the horse race; instead, we want to explain the stakes of the election through the issues that matter the most to you. To do that, we want to know what you think the US presidential candidates should be talking about. Tell us here: vox.com/ElectionVideos Sources and further reading: Alex Ward: www.vox.com/2020/8/18/21334630/joe-biden-foreign-policy-explainer Mira Rapp-Hooper, Shields of the Republic: www.amazon.com/Shields-Republic-Triumph-Americas-Alliances/dp/0674982959 Mark Webber and James Sperling: www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/CECD6A4DA95D3C177531E8C10A6E562B/S0260210519000123a.pdf/trumps_foreign_policy_and_nato_exit_and_voice.pdf Joyce Kaufman: www.chathamhouse.org/sites/default/files/publications/ia/INTA93_2_01_Kaufman.pdf Jennifer Lind: americas.chathamhouse.org/article/the-future-of-americas-ailing-alliances/ Klaus Larres: archive.transatlanticrelations.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Larres-Donald-Trump-and-America%E2%80%99s-Grand-Strategy-U.S.-foreign-policy-toward-Europe-Russia-and-China-Global-Policy-May-2017.pdf Fabrice Pothier and Alexander Vershbow: www.atlanticcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/NATO_and_Trump_web_0623.pdf Elena Atanassova-Cornelis: www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03932729.2019.1665272 Shin Kawashima, Matake Kamiya, James L. Schoff: carnegieendowment.org/2019/10/10/managing-risks-and-opportunities-for-u.s.-japan-alliance-through-coordinated-china-policy-pub-80026 Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How the next president could change policing | 2020 Election
How the next president could change policing | 2020 Election
13 dager siden
What the candidates can (and can’t) do about police reform. What do you wish the presidential candidates would talk about? vox.com/ElectionVideos Police reform is a major issue in the 2020 election, yet it’s also one of the issues the president has little control over. Police are primarily funded and managed by local governments instead of the federal government. So when it comes to what the president or Congress can actually do to change policing in America…it’s pretty limited. But the federal government does have the power to change what's called qualified immunity. It’s a legal protection that shields police from lawsuits over violations of people’s constitutional rights. For protesters of police brutality, reforming it is at the top of their list. And its future could hang on the election. This video is the fifth in our series on the 2020 election. We aren’t covering the horse race; instead, we want to explain the stakes of the election through the issues that matter the most to you. To do that, we want to know what you think the US presidential candidates should be talking about. Tell us here: vox.com/ElectionVideos Read more about qualified immunity here, from Vox: www.vox.com/2020/6/3/21277104/qualified-immunity-cops-constitution-shaniz-west-supreme-court And read more about both candidates' police plans: www.vox.com/21418125/biden-harris-pelosi-defund-the-police-criminal-justice-reform-2020 www.vox.com/2020-presidential-election/21418911/donald-trump-crime-criminal-justice-policy-record Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How robots made this food commercial look effortless
How robots made this food commercial look effortless
14 dager siden
Creating the perfect food commercial isn’t just a matter of great styling and a mouth-watering dish. Sometimes, you need a robot. Steve Giralt is a “visual engineer.” Check out his Instagram for more: instagram.com/stevegiralt/ The team that built this rig shares amazing BTS as well. instagram.com/garageriley instagram.com/mattphub Or explore his website as he starts working on educational content about his work: www.thegaragelearning.com/ Giralt began his career as a stills photographer, but he saw potential for more thanks to his hobbies in engineering. A new discipline was born: visual engineering, using robotics, advanced camerawork, and a lot of creativity to create moving images that have never been seen before. His Smores have lit up Times Square, and, in the video above, you can watch how he uses trial and error (and more than a few robots) to drop the perfect lime. Giralt’s toolkit includes Arduino programming, Maya, welding, epoxies, super-expensive cameras that can shoot incredible slow motion, and a lot of elbow grease and ingenuity. This form of commercial art shows how technology can make incredible images happen - and you don’t always need computer graphics to do it. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How the US poisoned Navajo Nation
How the US poisoned Navajo Nation
17 dager siden
The biggest radioactive spill in US history. As World War Two was ending, the growing nuclear arms race put the US in need of uranium. It turned to Navajo Nation, where the uranium mining industry thrived for four decades -- but left disease, pollution and the biggest radioactive spill in US history. That spill in Church Rock, New Mexico upended the lives of nearby residents, who had to grapple with toxic water, livestock and a lifetime of illnesses. Now, they are still waiting for it to be cleaned up. Note: The headline for this piece has been updated. Previous headline: The biggest radioactive spill in US history Have an idea for a story that we should investigate for Missing Chapter? Send it to us via this form! bit.ly/2RhjxMy Sign up for the Missing Chapter newsletter to stay up to date with the series: vox.com/missing-chapter Explore the full Missing Chapter playlist, including episodes, a creator Q&A, and more! noburn.info/put/PLJ8cMiYb3G5fR2kt0L4Nihvel4pEDw9od Learn more about the Church Rock spill and the impacts of uranium mining at the Southwest Research and Information Center: www.sric.org/uranium/rirf.php Read the book by Doug Brugge, Timothy Benally, and Esther Yazzie-Lewis, The Navajo People and Uranium Mining: unmpress.com/books/navajo-people-and-uranium-mining/9780826337795 Read the book Yellow Dirt, by Judy Pasternak, on uranium mining in Navajo Nation: www.simonandschuster.com/books/Yellow-Dirt/Judy-Pasternak/9781416594833 Check out the documentary “The Return of Navajo Boy,” which looks at the uranium industry in Navajo Nation: navajoboy.com/watch/ Learn about the Red Water Pond Road Community Association and other local groups through the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment: swuraniumimpacts.org/red-water-pond-road-community-association Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How US schools punish Black kids | 2020 Election
How US schools punish Black kids | 2020 Election
21 dag siden
For the 50 million kids who attend public schools in the US, the 2020 election is personal. What do you wish the presidential candidates would talk about? vox.com/ElectionVideos When it comes to who gets punished and removed from American classrooms, the US doesn’t treat all students equally. Black students get suspended and expelled far more frequently than their white classmates, and often for the same or similar offenses. And the weeks of school that Black kids miss each year can kick off a chain reaction that changes a child’s future. But the US education system gives the American president a tremendous amount of power over public schools. Whoever holds the Presidency decides how schools handle things like testing, class size, and discipline. During the Obama administration, the US Department of Education started to take the country’s school discipline problem seriously. They investigated the schools with significant racial gaps in punishment rates, and issued guidance on how to replace outdated policies with more effective ones. Then Betsy DeVos, President Trump’s education secretary, abandoned those efforts. Trump's administration stopped releasing discipline data, changed the standard of what constitutes racist outcomes, and scaled back efforts to fix or even acknowledge racial disparities in how we punish kids. In this video we explain the origins of this crisis, and how the 2020 election could change things. This video is the fourth in our series on the 2020 election. We aren’t covering the horse race; instead, we want to explain the stakes of the election through the issues that matter the most to you. To do that, we want to know what you think the US presidential candidates should be talking about. Tell us here: vox.com/ElectionVideos If you want to learn more about racial disparities in school discipline, check out the UCLA Civil Rights Project. They’ve been studying this crisis for years: www.civilrightsproject.ucla.edu/research/k-12-education/school-discipline Our colleagues at ProPublica, particularly Annie Waldman, have done extensive investigative work chronicling how the Trump administration has neglected to enforce students’ civil rights: www.propublica.org/article/devos-has-scuttled-more-than-1-200-civil-rights-probes-inherited-from-obama The Texas schools study we mention in the video is publicly available through the Center for State Governments: knowledgecenter.csg.org/kc/system/files/Breaking_School_Rules.pdf Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How colorized photos helped introduce Japan to the world
How colorized photos helped introduce Japan to the world
26 dager siden
The best hand-colored photos of the 19th century came from Japan. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab For over 200 years, Japan isolated itself from the outside world by forbidding most foreigners from entering the country. But in 1854, a US naval expedition of warships forced Japan to open its port cities, resulting in a flood of curious travelers from Europe and North America, who established businesses there. Photography became a leading industry in newly opened Japan, to satisfy a market of curious outsiders who wanted to know what the country and its people really looked like. Foreign photographers like Felice Beato and Baron Raimund von Stillfried established photo studios, and they employed fine artists from the Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock print industry to carefully apply watercolors to their prints. Eventually, those same apprentices dominated the market with their own photo studios. By the 20th century, mainly due to the advent of amateur photography, the souvenir photo industry in Japan declined. But for the last half of the 19th century, photos made - and carefully hand-colored - in Japanese photo studios were important documents for how the world came to know Japanese culture. Further reading: A Good Type: Tourism and Science in Early Japanese Photographs, by David Odo www.peabody.harvard.edu/node/2080 Sites of “Disconnectedness”: The Port City of Yokohama, Souvenir Photography, and its Audience, by Mio Wakita-Elis heiup.uni-heidelberg.de/journals/index.php/transcultural/article/view/11067/5640 Photography in Japan 1853-1912, by Terry Bennett www.tuttlepublishing.com/books-by-country/photography-in-japan-1853-1912-hardcover-with-jacket Darkroom is a history and photography series that anchors each episode around a single image. Analyzing what the photo shows (or doesn't show) provides context that helps unravel a wider story. Watch previous episodes here: noburn.info/id/video/ypjMgK59pa1qpKA.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The $12 trillion ripple effect of Covid-19 [Advertiser content from the Gates Foundation]
The $12 trillion ripple effect of Covid-19 [Advertiser content from the Gates Foundation]
26 dager siden
The pandemic has hit everyone, but it has hit us all in different ways. Many lives have been lost, a number that just entered seven digits. Millions have lost jobs. Others have lost trust in their fellow citizens. Entire sectors of private industry have been upended. Those who have been infected and recovered may yet deal with medical repercussions for the rest of their lives. None of the above consequences occur in a vacuum. They are not independent repercussions, but the interdependent fallout of a global health crisis. In this vein, you can’t tackle the multiple ripples created by the pandemic as if they were isolated from one another. Learn more here - www.vox.com/ad/21449555/gates-foundation-goalkeepers-pandemic-economic-loss Link for NOburn: vimeo.com/461612053/29e0562bec
The forgotten “wade-ins” that transformed the US
The forgotten “wade-ins” that transformed the US
Måned siden
How beaches and pools became a battleground for US civil rights. Listen to the story on this episode of Today, Explained: spoti.fi/2GuKqLz When we think of the iconic moments of the Civil Rights Movement in the US, we might imagine bus boycotts, lunch counter sit-ins or the March on Washington. Most of us won’t think of protests at beaches and pools. Yet these battles in the country’s waters played a crucial role in transforming America. The campaign in the waters of St. Augustine, Florida, became one of the most critical in the movement to desegregate the US. The photos were published around the world, but the full story has often been left out of our history textbooks. And now, the legacy of segregated public waters continues to this day. Note: The headline for this piece has been updated. Previous headline: How beaches became a battleground for US civil rights. Have an idea for a story that we should investigate for Missing Chapter? Send it to us via this form! bit.ly/2RhjxMy Sign up for the Missing Chapter newsletter to stay up to date with the series: vox.com/missing-chapter Explore the full Missing Chapter playlist, including episodes, a creator Q&A, and more! noburn.info/put/PLJ8cMiYb3G5fR2kt0L4Nihvel4pEDw9od Check out the work of Clennon King in his full-length documentary and discussion program about St. Augustine’s Civil Rights movement, “Passage at St. Augustine”: augustinemonica.com/%22passage-at-st-augustine%22 More information about the Civil Rights Movement in St. Augustine at ACCORD Freedom Trail: accordfreedomtrail.org/ Archives from the Civil Rights Library of St. Augustine: cdm16000.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/ Read Andrew Kahrl’s books on the movement to desegregate public waters: uncpress.org/book/9781469628721/the-land-was-ours/ ; yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300215144/free-beaches Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What voter suppression looks like online
What voter suppression looks like online
28 dager siden
Why Russian operatives and domestic parties target Black voters in US elections. Join the Open Sourced Reporting Network: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork Subscribe to our channel and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: goo.gl/0bsAjO According to a report by CNN, the federal government has warned that Russia "might seek to covertly discourage or suppress US voters from participating" in the upcoming election. If so, it would be a repeat of their tactics four years ago, when Russian operatives posing as Americans on social media discouraged Black Americans from voting or encouraged them to vote for the third-party candidate, Jill Stein. The Trump campaign itself pursued a strategy of vote suppression targeted at African Americans, who vote against Republicans at higher rates than any other demographic group. While voter suppression takes many forms - from intimidation at polling places to purges of voter rolls to strict ID requirements - this video focuses on digital voter suppression, where the goal is to infiltrate communities online and deliver covert messages that discourage participation in elections. We explain what those messages look like, and why they so often target Black voters. Open Sourced is a year-long reporting project from Recode by Vox that goes deep into the closed ecosystems of data, privacy, algorithms, and artificial intelligence. Learn more at www.vox.com/opensourced This project is made possible by the Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists. Watch all episodes of Open Sourced right here on NOburn: bit.ly/2tIHftD Become a part of the Open Sourced Reporting Network and help our reporting. Join here: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork Sources: medium.com/@ushadrons about.fb.com/news/2020/09/additional-steps-to-protect-the-us-elections/ digitalcommons.unl.edu/senatedocs/2/ journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0894439320914853 www.brennancenter.org/our-work/analysis-opinion/new-evidence-shows-how-russias-election-interference-has-gotten-more www.brennancenter.org/our-work/analysis-opinion/voter-suppression-has-gone-digital edition.cnn.com/2020/03/12/world/russia-ghana-troll-farms-2020-ward/index.html www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/08/26/race-divisions-highlighted-disinformation-2016/ repository.law.umich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1290&context=mjrl www.intelligence.senate.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Report_Volume2.pdf stoponlinevaw.com/stop-digital-voter-suppression-project/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o If you value Vox’s unique explanatory journalism, support our work with a one-time or recurring contribution: www.vox.com/contribute
How US abortion policy targets the poor | 2020 Election
How US abortion policy targets the poor | 2020 Election
Måned siden
The 2020 US election could decide the fate of a 40-year-old ban on abortion funding. What do you wish the presidential candidates would talk about? vox.com/ElectionVideos For the past 44 years, every US Congress and president have approved a federal budget that includes a ban on federal funding for abortion services, except in extreme cases. It's known as the Hyde Amendment, and even politicians who support abortion access have voted in favor of it. But the landscape of abortion access has evolved so much that Joe Biden might become the first president to lift the Hyde Amendment from the federal budget. Banning federal funding for abortion services primarily affects people who rely on Medicaid for their health care: people who are living close to the poverty line in the US or are disabled. This has the effect of preventing some of the country’s most vulnerable people from accessing abortion services, since they are the least likely to be able to afford an out-of-pocket expense. This video is the third in our series on the 2020 election. We aren’t covering the horse race; instead, we want to explain the stakes of the election through the issues that matter the most to you. To do that, we want to know what you think the US presidential candidates should be talking about. Tell us here: vox.com/ElectionVideos Further reading: For some of Vox's coverage on the impact of the Hyde Amendment: www.vox.com/identities/2019/6/20/18683995/abortion-hyde-amendment-medicaid-insurance-louisiana For a history of the Democratic party and the Hyde Amendment: www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2019/06/democrats-hyde-amendment-history/591646/ For Kaiser Family Foundation's analysis of the Hyde Amendment's impact: www.kff.org/womens-health-policy/issue-brief/the-hyde-amendment-and-coverage-for-abortion-services/ Note: The headline on this piece has been updated. Previous headline: How the US keeps poor people from accessing abortion | 2020 Election Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What it means to be Black in Brazil
What it means to be Black in Brazil
Måned siden
Racism rooted in slavery has not gone away in Brazil - and it took time until its existence was even acknowledged. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Brazil imported more African slaves than any other country in the world: over 4 million people. Despite the ancestry forming a big part of the population, the development of a national Black identity was hindered after the country’s abolition of slavery in 1888. Brazil didn’t have an apartheid system like South Africa’s or Jim Crow laws like the United States, and its mixed population was seen as a symbol of harmony between races. The idea of Brazil being a “racial democracy” affected how Brazilians saw the role of race in their own lives - until the myth was debunked. “Several people were raised with certain privileges for being a light-skinned person, but still suffering some discrimination and not understanding exactly why is that so,” explains lawyer and diversity studies professor Thiago Amparo. “Only by understanding the history of Brazil, the [social] construction of whiteness and their own Black ancestry, they start to self-identify as Black.” The rise in the number of Brazilians who self-identify as Black came as a result of the Black movement’s fight to denounce racism in the country and to promote positive references of Blackness. Many achievements have been made over the past decades, such as the implementation of affirmative action practices. However, challenges remain. Seventy-five percent of people killed by police in Brazil in 2019 were Black, and socio-economic characteristics of this population widely differ from those of white people. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How the Beirut explosion was a government failure
How the Beirut explosion was a government failure
Måned siden
And why Lebanon is on the verge of collapse. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO On August 4, 2020, a massive explosion rocked Beirut, the capital city of Lebanon. The blast occurred when sparks in a warehouse hit a stockpile of ammonium nitrate - a highly explosive material - that was stored in the city's port. It was one of the largest accidental explosions in history and it couldn't have occurred at a worse time for Lebanon. For the past several years, the country has been sliding into an economic depression and a political crisis. The root causes began during the country's 20-year civil war and extend to the organization of the government, in which control is divided among the country's many religious sects. After years of corruption and negligence, Lebanon's people are now stuck picking up the pieces. Sources and additional reading: New York Times Visual Investigations: www.nytimes.com/2020/08/05/world/middleeast/beirut-explosion-footage.html Carnegie Endowment: carnegieendowment.org/2016/05/16/unraveling-of-lebanon-s-taif-agreement-limits-of-sect-based-power-sharing-pub-63571 Ahmad Barclay: twitter.com/bothness/status/1186967940178071552 The Economist: www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2019/10/24/a-surge-of-public-anger-sends-lebanons-politicians-reeling Ziad Abu-Rish / Jadaliyya: www.jadaliyya.com/Details/33377 Triangle: www.thinktriangle.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Extend_Pretend_Lebanons_Financial_House_of_Cards_2019.pdf Financial Times: ftalphaville.ft.com/2019/12/18/1576679115000/Understanding-the-Lebanese-financial-crisis/ Mohamad Bazzi / Foreign Affairs: www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/lebanon/2020-08-14/corrupt-political-class-broke-lebanon Dion Nissenbaum, Nazih Osseiran, Georgi Kantchev and Benoit Faucon / The Wall Street Journal: www.wsj.com/articles/behind-the-beirut-explosion-seven-years-of-official-neglect-11596842032 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What long voting lines in the US really mean | 2020 Election
What long voting lines in the US really mean | 2020 Election
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The sneaky ways that some US states make it harder to vote. What do you wish the presidential candidates would talk about? vox.com/ElectionVideos The process of voting isn’t the same for all Americans. Depending on where you live, you might vote on a screen, a punchcard, or a piece of paper. You might have to show an ID to vote, or you might not. And you might have to wait a long time, or you might not. Some of these differences don’t really matter. But some of them make voting harder. And sometimes they can keep people from voting altogether. For decades, the US had a civil rights law that made sure those differences were fair, and didn’t disproportionately keep certain people from voting: the 1965 Voting Rights Act. But in 2013, the US Supreme Court gutted that law, allowing states to pass a slew of new voting laws. Those new laws often had the effect of making it harder for poor people and people of color to vote. And the 2020 US election will be shaped in part by those laws. But the same election will also decide the future of those laws. This video is the second in our series on the 2020 election. We aren’t covering the horse race; instead, we want to explain the stakes of the election through the issues that matter the most to you. To do that, we want to know what you think the US presidential candidates should be talking about. Tell us here: vox.com/ElectionVideos For more information on polling place closures, check out the Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights 2019 report: civilrights.org/democracy-diverted/ Read The Guardian’s piece on Texas polling place closures: www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/mar/02/texas-polling-sites-closures-voting Information on 1960s voter registration came from the US Commission on Civil Rights: www.usccr.gov/pubs/2018/Minority_Voting_Access_2018.pdf Check out more info on Texas voting laws at the Texas Civil Rights Project: txcivilrights.org/voting-rights/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How to prioritize and manage savings when home [Advertiser content from Bank of America]
How to prioritize and manage savings when home [Advertiser content from Bank of America]
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In this segment from the Money Talks: Home Habits series, powered by Bank of America, Vox publisher Melissa Bell is joined by Tonya Rapley, financial educator and founder of My Fab Finance to discuss how to reprioritize personal finance goals right now, whether you’ve experienced a loss in income, or are saving on normal expenses, such as transportation or dining out. Rapley also conducted one-on-one counseling sessions with two audience members dealing with their own unique financial circumstances. Learn more, and watch the full Money Talks: Home Habits series - www.vox.com/ad/21288443/home-habits-explained
How reality TV shows cast the right people
How reality TV shows cast the right people
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How do you find the perfect person for a reality show? We spoke to the casting director for Queer Eye (and a ton of other shows) to find out. Danielle Gervais is the Emmy-winning casting director for Netflix’s Queer Eye (and she and her team are nominated this year as well). In addition to the hit series, she’s cast everything from Pawn Stars to Wife Swap. Vox’s Phil Edwards spoke to her about what it takes to find the right people at the center of each episode: the “heroes” that the show’s core cast give a makeover (or, in Danielle’s words, a “make better”). It’s not just her and her team sitting in an audition room. After hashing out story themes and location for the new season, they’ll hit the ground in their new setting (in normal circumstances) and try to find the perfect people to feature on the show. Extensive interviews and background checks help finish the project - and the result of all that hard work is an hour of seamless entertainment, with a perfect star at the center. Check out Danielle's IMDb page here: www.imdb.com/name/nm3896030/ Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How America can leave fossil fuels behind, in one chart | 2020 Election
How America can leave fossil fuels behind, in one chart | 2020 Election
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And what the 2020 US election means for climate change. What do you wish the presidential candidates would talk about? vox.com/ElectionVideos All of recorded human history has happened during a period in which the average global temperature didn’t change by more than 1 degree Celsius. But the burning of fossil fuels has triggered a temperature rise projected to exceed 3 degrees by the end of the century. It will be catastrophic. But it can be avoided if we massively scale back the burning of fossil fuels. The US isn’t the biggest emitter of carbon dioxide in the world, but it's emitted more carbon dioxide in total than any other country. So the US has an important role to play in global decarbonization; the world basically can’t get there without the US’s full participation. But the current US president doesn’t have any plans to do that. His Democratic challenger in the 2020 election, Joe Biden, does. Biden’s plan is ambitious: Its goal is to completely transition the US to clean energy by 2050. But his plan doesn’t get into the details of exactly how that will happen. For that, we talked to physicist and engineer Saul Griffith, who took us through his incredibly detailed road map for how the US could actually walk away from fossil fuels in the next 30 years. This video is the first in our series on the 2020 election. We aren’t covering the horse race; instead, we want to explain the stakes of the election through the issues that matter the most to you. To do that, we want to know what you think the US presidential candidates should be talking about. Tell us here: vox.com/ElectionVideos You can check out Saul Griffith’s report on decarbonizing the US through electrification at Rewiring America: www.rewiringamerica.org/handbook And explore his Sankey diagram of the US energy economy in detail here: energyliteracy.com/ To read more about the fluctuations in Earth’s global average temperature and why the current spike is so dangerous, check these sources: www.climate.gov/news-features/climate-qa/what%E2%80%99s-hottest-earth-has-been-%E2%80%9Clately%E2%80%9D data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/graphs_v3/ climate.nasa.gov/news/2865/a-degree-of-concern-why-global-temperatures-matter/ www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/2018/03/ipcc_far_wg_I_spm.pdf Read more about why carbon dioxide is so problematic for climate change here: www.ucsusa.org/resources/why-does-co2-get-more-attention-other-gases You can dig into historic carbon emissions by country or region at Our World in Data: ourworldindata.org/grapher/annual-co-emissions-by-region The impact of the Trump administration on climate change is covered in more depth on our website: www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2020/8/27/21374894/trump-election-second-term-climate-change-energy-russia-china www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/21349200/climate-change-fossil-fuels-rewiring-america-electrify Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How the pandemic distorted time
How the pandemic distorted time
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Our perception of time is incredibly malleable - no wonder the pandemic upended it. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO There used to be this thing called a party. The concept was simple - gather a bunch of living, breathing bodies in the same place at the same time and just see what happens. And if my friends wanted me to be on time to a party, they’d lie. I wasn’t proud of my reputation with time. Once, someone was describing their color blindness to me and it reminded me a lot of how I feel about time. How I know that 3 pm and 3:05 pm are technically different, but I personally don’t perceive that contrast. I tried my best to banish those thoughts. I bought clocks and set them to five minutes early. And I was finally closing the gap - becoming one of those people who holds the reins of time. And then - the pandemic happened. And suddenly Tuesdays were Thursdays were Sundays. The whole world joined me in temporal disorientation - even my punctual superiors were at a loss. They knew how to arrive five minutes early - not how to repeat the same five minutes 43,854 times. Maybe we’ve all been too fixated on keeping track of time when what we need most is vocabulary to describe the new colors of time. We were thrilled to work with filmmaker Sindha Agha on this video. For more of her work check out: www.sindhaagha.com/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How to be a cloud detective
How to be a cloud detective
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What different clouds mean, explained for kids. Welcome to our first-ever week of programming for kids! If you’re standing outside and you look up, you’ll likely see something familiar above you: clouds! They can be long and skinny, low and rumbly, white and fluffy, or anything in between. But what do these different shapes and colors tell us? Every cloud is packed full of information, and knowing a bit about them can help you tell the difference between different types - and help you predict the weather. For example, cumulus clouds are pretty easy to spot. They’re the classic cloud shape: big, fluffy, white cotton balls in the sky. These usually mean fair weather; when you see them, it’s a good day to be outside. If you see a big blanket of clouds covering the sky, they might be altostratus - and they might mean that rain is coming. Dr. Mayra Oyola from NASA’s jet propulsion lab helped me identify these and other clouds, both common and uncommon. She shared some tips for how we can all get better at decoding clouds. To download and print out your own cloud chart, like the one we showed in this video, get permission from your guardian or parent or have them click this link: vox.com/clouds Correction: We misspelled "Mammatus" at 5:30. Resources: The Cloud Appreciation Society: cloudappreciationsociety.org/ National Oceanic and Atmospheric’s cloud satellites: www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES/index.php We designed these episodes for kids ages 9-13, but we hope all of our audience enjoys them! You can find all of our kids videos here: bit.ly/3hLA3Ro You may notice that comments are disabled on our kids’ videos. This is a default function of NOburn for kids programming. If you’re a parent, educator, or a kid at heart, please sign up for our newsletter for updates on all of our upcoming kids’ programming at Vox, from podcasts to videos to new shows: www.vox.com/kids Special thanks to Rachel Gianni, a consultant we worked with on this week of programming www.rachelgiannini.com/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The secret history of dirt
The secret history of dirt
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Dirt isn’t just the stuff beneath our feet. It’s the stuff of life. Welcome to our first-ever week of programming for kids! Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Dirt is alive. It's full of billions of creatures so small you can't even see them under a microscope. For 10,000 years, dirt has helped humans convert the limitless energy of the sun into the plants and animals we eat to keep us alive. Dirt has been good to us. But it turns out, we haven't been very good to the dirt. Roll up your sleeves. It's time to get dirty. We designed these episodes for kids ages 9-13, but we hope all of our audience enjoys them! You can find all of our kids videos here: bit.ly/3hLA3Ro You may notice that comments are disabled on our kids’ videos. This is a default function of NOburn for kids programming. If you’re a parent, educator, or a kid at heart, please sign up for our newsletter for updates on all of our upcoming kids’ programming at Vox, from podcasts to videos to new shows: www.vox.com/kids Try the dirt experiment featured in this episode for yourself. Get permission from your parent or guardian to visit this link to download and print out instructions (or have them do it for you!): www.vox.com/21418935/soil-health-farming-dirt-compost Special thanks to Rachel Gianni, a consultant we worked with on this week of programming www.rachelgiannini.com/ Additional reading and sources: Soil Foodweb Institute (Australia): www.soilfoodweb.com.au/ Civilizations rise and fall on the quality of their soil (Science Daily): www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131104035245.htm One amazing substance allowed life to thrive on land (BBC): www.bbc.com/earth/story/20151205-one-amazing-substance-allowed-life-to-thrive-on-land The Rhizosphere: An Ecological Perspective (Academic Press, 2007): www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/microfauna#:~:text=4.2%20Microfauna,protists%2C%20nematodes%2C%20and%20rotifers. The Big Bloom-How Flowering Plants Changed the World (National Geographic): www.nationalgeographic.com/science/prehistoric-world/big-bloom/#:~:text=They%20began%20changing%20the%20way,only%20the%20last%2090%20seconds. Soil Science Society of America (SSSA): soilsmatter.wordpress.com/ Farmers and Their Languages: The First Expansions (Science): science.sciencemag.org/content/300/5619/597 The Science Behind the Three sisters (Cornell University): www.cornell.edu/video/first-peoples-first-crops-4-the-science-behind-the-three-sisters Amazonian Dark Earths: Geoarchaeology. (Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology): link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-1-4419-0465-2_2252 Why It’s Time to Stop Punishing Our Soils with Fertilizers (Yale Environment 360): e360.yale.edu/features/why-its-time-to-stop-punishing-our-soils-with-fertilizers-and-chemicals Only 60 Years of Farming Left If Soil Degradation Continues (Scientific American): www.scientificamerican.com/article/only-60-years-of-farming-left-if-soil-degradation-continues/ Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why bird nests aren't covered in poop
Why bird nests aren't covered in poop
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An ornithologist explains how robin hatchlings and their parents keep their nest clean. Welcome to our first-ever week of programming for kids! Earlier this year I noticed a bird nest with a single bright blue egg sitting on my front porch. Over the course of a few days, the single egg turned into four, and in a few more days, they hatched. What I witnessed over the course of watching these birds grow was magical, but it also left me with a lot of questions about what goes on in the beginning of a bird's life. My biggest question: Where does all the bird poop go? To answer all of my question about these baby birds, I spoke with professor of biology and lifelong bird lover Michael Murphy about the weird and often gross things birds do to survive. If you're looking to learn more about birds here are two incredible resources: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology K-12 online learning: bit.ly/31NR2wY National Audubon Society: www.audubon.org/birding We designed these episodes for kids ages 9-13, but we hope all of our audience enjoys them! You can find all of our kids videos here: bit.ly/3hLA3Ro You may notice that comments are disabled on our kids’ videos. This is a default function of NOburn for kids programming. If you’re a parent, educator, or a kid at heart, please sign up for our newsletter for updates on all of our upcoming kids’ programming at Vox, from podcasts to videos to new shows: www.vox.com/kids Special thanks to Rachel Gianni, a consultant we worked with on this week of programming www.rachelgiannini.com/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
I made a catapult to launch marshmallows! Thanks, Leonardo da Vinci.
I made a catapult to launch marshmallows! Thanks, Leonardo da Vinci.
2 måneder siden
It’s time to make a catapult. Welcome to our first-ever week of programming for kids! We wanted to launch some marshmallows, so we built a miniature machine based on Leonardo da Vinci’s designs. Leonardo da Vinci was a famous artist and inventor, and his sketchbooks include a couple of catapult drawings that you can use to make a catapult model. We did just that, and it was a lot of fun. Catapults have a long history, going back to the ancient world (and appearing all across it, from China to Rome). They were used throughout history to bombard castle walls and enemies with projectiles, and they were adapted in the Middle Ages into agents of biological warfare. There are different types, like a mangonel, a trebuchet, and a ballista, each of which has its own unique advantages. Our catapult is inspired by da Vinci’s, and it features some really creative ways to generate and store power. We hope you like it - and maybe you’ll try it yourself! You can find the model we used here: www.amazon.com/Pathfinders-Roman-Catapult-Model-Kit/dp/B07BB3KY86 Thanks to Maymont for letting us shoot our video there: maymont.org/ We designed these episodes for kids ages 9-13, but we hope everyone in our audience enjoys them! You can find all of our kids videos here: bit.ly/3hLA3Ro You may notice that comments are disabled on our kids’ videos. This is a default function of NOburn for kids programming. If you’re a parent, an educator, or a kid at heart, please sign up for our newsletter for updates on all of our upcoming kids’ programming at Vox, from podcasts to videos to new shows: www.vox.com/kids Special thanks to Rachel Gianni, a consultant we worked with on this week of programming! www.rachelgiannini.com/ Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What Black Lives Matter means to an 11-year-old
What Black Lives Matter means to an 11-year-old
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Eleven-year-old Jolia Bossette on being a Black kid in America. Welcome to our first-ever week of programming for kids! The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and hundreds of other Black Americans at the hands of police officers have inspired protests across the country and around the world. The news coverage has been impossible for most of us to ignore, and it begs the question: How are kids, especially Black kids, processing this reality? How do they make sense of these deaths and the systemic factors that made them possible? In June of 2020,11-year-old Californian Jolia Bossette decided to use her fifth-grade graduation speech as an occasion to give voice to her thoughts and feelings. In her speech, she reminisced about how she was "the cutest thing," as a toddler and asked, "But when did I stop being cute and start being scary?" "Does my dad scare you? Does my mom scare you? Does my auntie scare you? Because let me tell you something: We are not scary." Check out Vox’s Today Explained podcast, which features a great episode for all ages about racial justice in the US: www.vox.com/2020/8/29/21404446/systemic-racism-explained-to-kids Historian Michael Kazin explains how the Black Lives Matter movement fits into the tradition of American political and cultural movements, (Vox): www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/21306771/black-lives-matter-george-floyd-protest-michael-kazin We designed these episodes for kids ages 9-13, but we hope all of our audience enjoys them! You can find all of our kids videos here: bit.ly/3hLA3Ro You may notice that comments are disabled on our kids’ videos. This is a default function of NOburn for kids' programming. If you’re a parent, educator, or a kid at heart, please sign up for our newsletter for updates on all of our upcoming kids’ programming at Vox, from podcasts to videos to new shows: www.vox.com/kids Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The problem with banning TikTok
The problem with banning TikTok
2 måneder siden
TikTok’s in trouble. But so is the internet as we know it. Join the Open Sourced Reporting Network: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO On August 6, President Trump issued an executive order prohibiting transactions with the video-sharing app TikTok. His order said that because TikTok is owned by the Beijing-based company ByteDance, the app could pose national security and privacy risks to users in the US. But the Trump administration’s targeting of TikTok marks a departure from America’s traditional position on internet governance and online free speech. And it also comes at a time when the concept of a global internet itself is under threat. Today a growing number of countries are pursuing various forms of internet sovereignty - from Russia building a walled-off “intranet,” to India regularly shutting down its internet in areas of social unrest, to some European nations introducing a “right to be forgotten” from search engines. All these trends point in the direction of a “splinternet,” where your experience of the internet increasingly depends on where you live, and the whims of the ruling parties there. As we explain in this video, that’s a tough environment for an app like TikTok, which became globally successful almost immediately, and which connects people from around the world in hyper-personalized but often international subcultures. With the excesses of the open internet visible daily (see: foreign election interference, data breaches, misinformation and hate speech, and domestic and corporate surveillance), the countries that do support a free internet will have to work hard to secure its future. But they may have to do it without the United States. Open Sourced is a year-long reporting project from Recode by Vox that goes deep into the closed ecosystems of data, privacy, algorithms, and artificial intelligence. Learn more at www.vox.com/opensourced This project is made possible by the Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists. Watch all episodes of Open Sourced right here on NOburn: bit.ly/2tIHftD Become a part of the Open Sourced Reporting Network and help our reporting. Join here: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork Sources: www.eugenewei.com/blog/2020/8/3/tiktok-and-the-sorting-hat papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3664027 www.newamerica.org/cybersecurity-initiative/reports/digital-deciders/ turner.substack.com/p/the-rise-of-tiktok-and-understanding stratechery.com/2020/the-tiktok-war/ www.lawfareblog.com/unpacking-tiktok-mobile-apps-and-national-security-risks www.ft.com/content/6a1b9b4d-ddbc-4b62-9101-221510fb7b45 www.bbc.com/future/article/20190514-the-global-internet-is-disintegrating-what-comes-next www.accessnow.org/cms/assets/uploads/2020/02/KeepItOn-2019-report-1.pdf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
When voting rights didn't protect all women
When voting rights didn't protect all women
2 måneder siden
The suffrage movement didn’t protect all women’s right to vote. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO On this landmark 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, historians Martha S. Jones and Daina Ramey Berry reflect on what the 19th Amendment means for Black American women. The women’s suffrage movement was a predominantly white cause, one that sacrificed the involvement of Black suffragists in return for support for the 19th Amendment from Southern states. The 1920 legislation enfranchised all American women, but it left Black women, particularly those living in the South, to fight racial discrimination when registering to vote and going to the polls. It wasn’t until the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that this type of racial discrimination was prohibited by federal law. The voting rights fight is still not over, however. There’s evidence that restrictions to voting disproportionately affect minority populations - measures like voter ID laws, voting purges, gerrymandering, and closing polling locations. The headline to this video has been changed. Previously it was titled: The myth of the 19th amendment For more of Vox’s coverage on the anniversary of the 19th Amendment: www.vox.com/2020/8/18/21358913/19th-amendment-ratified-anniversary-women-suffrage-vote www.vox.com/21356259/19th-amendment-suffragists-alice-paul-pankhursts www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/21364998/19th-amendment-women-equal-pay-economy-poverty-maternity-leave For Martha S. Jones’s forthcoming book on Black women’s voting rights fight: www.basicbooks.com/titles/martha-s-jones/vanguard/9781541618619/ For Daina Ramey Berry’s book on African American’s women’s history: www.beacon.org/A-Black-Womens-History-of-the-United-States-P1524.aspx For a piece on the importance of photography for Black suffragists: www.nytimes.com/2020/08/12/arts/19th-amendment-black-womens-suffrage-photos.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why face masks became political in the US
Why face masks became political in the US
2 måneder siden
How America screwed up its messaging on masks. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO The message from public health experts is clear: Wearing a mask can help stop the spread of coronavirus. But that message hasn't completely gotten through; many Americans still simply don't believe it. It's a major failure of communication, one that has almost certainly cost lives. But the US government actually had a plan to prevent almost this exact situation from happening: A written set of rules to communicating in a public health crisis, including how to make sure that public health information doesn't get mixed up with politics. But then, when the biggest health crisis in a century arrived, they ignored it completely. Read the CERC for yourself: emergency.cdc.gov/cerc/manual/index.asp And read the full story of how masks became a political issue in the US: www.vox.com/2020/7/21/21331310/mask-masks-trump-covid19-rule-georgia-alabama Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The next pandemic could come from our farms
The next pandemic could come from our farms
2 måneder siden
We've engineered the perfect environment for deadly new germs. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In the last half-century, the global production of meat has undergone a seismic shift. While meat was once mostly raised on small farms, today almost all the meat we eat comes from industrialized “factory” farms, known as “concentrated animal feeding operations,” or CAFOs. Animals in CAFOs are often packed closely together, which makes them both efficient and, for many, ethically dubious. But infectious disease experts worry about CAFOs for a different reason: Because they’re also an ideal environment for virus and bacteria mutations that human immune systems have never seen. In other words, they’re a highly likely source for the next pandemic. You can read more about the pathogen risks in factory farming at Vox.com: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2020/4/22/21228158/coronavirus-pandemic-risk-factory-farming-meat A deeper look at the threat of antibiotic resistant bacteria: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/5/7/18535480/drug-resistance-antibiotics-un-report Further reading on how RNA virus reassortment works: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5119462/ Martha Nelson's study tracking the origins of the 2009 H1N1 virus: elifesciences.org/articles/16777 Read more about the sources of meat produced around the world from the Sentience Institute: www.sentienceinstitute.org/global-animal-farming-estimates The US Center for Disease Control's timeline of the H1N1 pandemic: www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/cdcresponse.htm A hopeful look at where factory farming might be headed in the US: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/12/20/21028200/factory-farms-abuse-workers-animals-and-the-environment-cory-booker-has-a-plan-to-stop-them Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Help us cover the US election
Help us cover the US election
2 måneder siden
What do you think the candidates should be talking about? Tell us here: vox.com/ElectionVideos The US has a huge election coming up, but to explain it, we want your help. Instead of deciding on our own what the most important issues are, we want to know what you think is important. Tell us at the link above: What do you wish the candidates in the 2020 US election would talk about? Once we’ve heard from you, we’ll update our Community tab with the list of the ideas that we’re turning into videos, so you’ll know what’s in the works. Starting in September, we’ll publish one video from that list every week. A lot of news coverage of elections focuses on the polls, or the candidates’ personalities, or predictions about who might win. With this project, we want to do something different, and focus instead on how your lives might be affected by the election’s outcome. So tell us what you think the candidates in the US election should be talking about. And thanks for watching. Here’s that link again: vox.com/ElectionVideos Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The risky way to speed up a coronavirus vaccine
The risky way to speed up a coronavirus vaccine
2 måneder siden
A Covid-19 vaccine could take a long time. Some scientists are proposing a controversial plan that could get us one faster. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab With thousands of people dying of Covid-19 every day, the sooner a vaccine can be deemed safe and effective, the better. But vaccine development is a lengthy process that isn’t easy to rush, and that’s in part because of the final step in testing any vaccine: the phase III trial. Phase III requires tens of thousands of volunteers, each of whom get either a placebo or an experimental vaccine. The problem is the next part: Vaccine developers have to wait until a statistically significant number of them, going about their lives normally, eventually get naturally infected. This can take years. To speed that up, some epidemiologists and scientists are calling for something called a human challenge trial, in which a subject who has been given the vaccine is deliberately infected. This isn’t a new concept; human challenge trials have been used to develop vaccines or treatments for lots of diseases, like cholera, typhoid, malaria, influenza, and common cold viruses. But what sets Covid-19 apart from those diseases is that it currently has no effective treatment. Because it’s so new, we also aren’t fully aware of its long-term health effects. Unlike other human challenge trials, a Covid-19 challenge trial would entail a risk of serious illness - and even death. It’s because of those risks that a Covid-19 challenge trial would be limited to the young and healthy, who would be at the lowest risk of harm. But there are questions beyond the ethics. Would artificially infecting someone in a lab setting provide useful information on how to prevent natural infection? Would a study performed on only young and healthy people produce a vaccine that works for everyone? And with some vaccines already far along in their phase III trials, would a human challenge trial do any good at this point? Even though no Covid-19 human challenge trials are currently planned, more than 30,000 people from nearly 150 countries have already said they would volunteer for one if the opportunity presented itself. The question is, should we let them? Note: The headline on this piece has been updated. Previous headline: Would you volunteer to get Covid-19? Further reading: 1DaySooner is the grassroots organization recruiting volunteers for the possibility of a human challenge trial: 1daysooner.org/ For more of Vox’s coverage on human challenge studies: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2020/5/20/21258725/covid-19-human-challenge-trials-vaccine-update-sars-cov-2 For more on the ethical and acceptance concerns with vaccine development: medium.com/oxford-university/challenging-circumstances-we-need-international-guidelines-for-human-infection-studies-688051c869f9 For a history of challenge studies for other diseases: www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/05/studies-intentionally-infect-people-disease-causing-bugs-are-rise For coverage of the typhoid vaccine we mention in the video: www.nytimes.com/2017/09/28/health/typhoid-vaccine-trial.html For coverage of Oxford University’s statement on human challenge trials: www.theguardian.com/science/2020/jul/16/coronavirus-vaccine-oxford-team-volunteers-lab-controlled-human-challenge-trial Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The global coffee crisis is coming
The global coffee crisis is coming
2 måneder siden
It's becoming harder and harder to grow. Sources and Additional Reading: Andres Guhl etd.fcla.edu/UF/UFE0003960/guhl_a.pdf revistas.uniandes.edu.co/doi/pdf/10.7440/res32.2009.08 Phillip A. Hough and Jennifer Blair www.researchgate.net/publicat... Mike Hoffman fortune.com/2017/06/14/trump-paris-climate-change-agreement-coffee-prices/ Christian Bunn et al. link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-014-1306-x Davis et al., advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/1/eaav3473 CABI www.cabi.org/ Federación Nacional de Cafeteros federaciondecafeteros.org/ Richard Schiffman (Yale) e360.yale.edu/features/as-cli... Jessica Eise and Natalie Lambert ijoc.org/index.php/ijoc/article/view/11777/2907 apps.fas.usda.gov/newgainapi/api/report/downloadreportbyfilename?filename=Coffee%20Annual_Bogota_Colombia_5-14-2018.pdf Andy Jarvis link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-012-0500-y Coffee is one of the most popular commodities on Earth. It's grown by nearly 125 million farmers, from Latin America to Africa to Asia. But as man-made climate change warms the atmosphere, the notoriously particular coffee plant is struggling. Places like Colombia, which once had the perfect climate to grow Arabica coffee, are changing. Now, experts estimate the amount of land that can sustain coffee will fall 50 percent by 2050. It's not just a crisis for consumers but for the millions who have made a livelihood out of growing coffee. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The coronavirus is mutating. Now what?
The coronavirus is mutating. Now what?
2 måneder siden
The coronavirus is mutating, and scientists are concerned about one mutation in particular: D614G. Check out this episode of our Quibi show, Answered. There's a new episode daily you can watch here: link.quibi.com/answeredbyvoxyt Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO and find all of our coronavirus videos in one playlist, right here: noburn.info/put/PLJ8cMiYb3G5dBbOh_8kPN5s5aJHt1UCwn For more evidence-based explanations of the coronavirus crisis, from how it started to how it might end to how to protect yourself and others, visit: vox.com/coronavirus Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The British Museum is full of stolen artifacts
The British Museum is full of stolen artifacts
2 måneder siden
And so far, it isn't giving them back. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Some of the world’s greatest cultural and historical treasures are housed in London’s British Museum, and a significant number of them were taken during Britain’s centuries-long imperial rule. In recent years, many of the countries missing their cultural heritage have been asking for some of these items back. Benin City in Nigeria is one of those places. They've been calling for the return of the Benin Bronzes, hundreds of artifacts looted in 1897 when British soldiers embarked a punitive expedition to Benin. Many are now housed in the British Museum. And it's just the beginning. As the world reckons with the damage inflicted during Europe’s colonial global takeover, the calls for these items to be returned are getting louder and louder. To dig deeper into the 1897 Benin Punitive Expedition and the Benin Bronzes check out this book by Staffan Lunden: www.academia.edu/28886529/Displaying_Loot_The_Benin_objects_and_the_British_Museum And this article in the Journal of African History by Philip A. Igbafe: www.jstor.org/stable/180345?read-now=1&refreqid=excelsior%3A69638cc5f42d6c393bf469be14e6748f&seq=1 For more information on the two Benin Bronzes returned by Mark Walker, check out this piece by The Guardian: www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/dec/17/soldiers-grandson-to-return-items-looted-from-benin-city-nigeria Here are some links to learn more about the other contested items on the British Museum’s “Don’t Miss List” we reference in the video: Greece seeks return of Parthenon Marbles amid restoration project www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/07/greece-seeks-return-parthenon-marbles-restoration-project-200726142211780.html Egypt called; it wants its Rosetta Stone back www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=131309154 Easter Islanders call for return of statue from British Museum www.theguardian.com/culture/2019/jun/04/easter-islanders-call-for-return-of-statue-from-british-museum Tajik leader wants treasure from British Museum uk.reuters.com/article/uk-tajikistan-britain/tajik-leader-wants-treasure-from-british-museum-idUKL0521097620070405 Lastly, here is an opinion piece by prominent lawyer Geoffrey Robertson arguing why the pieces should be returned: www.theguardian.com/world/2019/nov/04/british-museum-is-worlds-largest-receiver-of-stolen-goods-says-qc And here is another opinion piece by author Tiffany Jenkins arguing why the pieces should stay in Western museums: www.theguardian.com/culture/2018/nov/25/benin-bronzes-why-western-museums-should-keep-treasures Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How “forever chemicals” polluted America’s water
How “forever chemicals” polluted America’s water
2 måneder siden
Why 99% of Americans have these chemicals in their blood. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab North Carolina’s Cape Fear River is a massive water system. It stretches across the lower half of the state, collecting runoff from 29 counties and providing water to millions of people. But in the city of Wilmington, where the river meets the Atlantic Ocean, the water has residents worried. In a 2019 test of tap water, Wilmington and neighboring Brunswick county were among the top five areas for high levels of PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances - a group of man-made chemicals commonly used for making nonstick or water-resistant products. Now North Carolina is reckoning with the legacy of pollution upstream - and discovering what decades of PFAS contamination means for the rest of the country. Check out these links to learn more: darkwaters.participant.com/action/ www.ewg.org/research/national-pfas-testing/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Facebook showed this ad to 95% women. Is that a problem?
Facebook showed this ad to 95% women. Is that a problem?
2 måneder siden
How algorithmic ad targeting can segregate us. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o In 2019, Facebook settled a lawsuit with civil rights groups following the revelation that advertisers using their platform could use the targeting options to exclude many specific demographics from seeing their ads. It's now more difficult for an unscrupulous advertiser to use Facebook's platform to discriminate. However, even when you remove human bias from the system, Facebook's ad delivery algorithms can result in biased outcomes. According to research from Northeastern University, Facebook sometimes displays ads to highly skewed audiences based on the content of the ad. By purchasing ads and inputting neutral targeting options, the researchers found that the algorithmically determined audience for job ads for cleaners, secretaries, nurses, and preschool teachers was mostly women. The job ads for fast food workers, supermarket cashiers, and taxi drivers skewed toward Black users. The studies show that by targeting "relevant" users, these systems can reinforce existing disparities in our interests and our opportunities. Sources: Discrimination through optimization: How Facebook's ad delivery can lead to skewed outcomes. arxiv.org/abs/1904.02095 Ad Delivery Algorithms: The Hidden Arbiters of Political Messaging arxiv.org/pdf/1912.04255.pdf HUD v. Facebook www.hud.gov/sites/dfiles/Main/documents/HUD_v_Facebook.pdf ProPublica: Facebook Ads can still discriminate against women and older workers www.propublica.org/article/facebook-ads-can-still-discriminate-against-women-and-older-workers-despite-a-civil-rights-settlement Facebook: Doing More to Protect Against Discrimination in Housing, Employment and Credit Advertising about.fb.com/news/2019/03/protecting-against-discrimination-in-ads/ facebook.com/business/news/good-questions-real-answers-how-does-facebook-use-machine-learning-to-deliver-ads/ Facebook: How Does Facebook Use Machine Learning to Deliver Ads? facebook.com/business/news/good-questions-real-answers-how-does-facebook-use-machine-learning-to-deliver-ads/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com
Tony Hawk breaks down skateboarding’s legendary spots
Tony Hawk breaks down skateboarding’s legendary spots
3 måneder siden
Full pipes, ledges, stair sets, and pools: These are the skate spots that made legends. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Tony Hawk, the legendary skateboarder, and Iain Borden, an architectural historian, are your guides in this deep dive into skateboarding history via the sport’s most iconic spots. From a giant pipe in the foothills of California's San Gabriel Mountains to a 20-stair set at a high school in Orange County, these everyday locations have become a proving ground for skaters all over the world. Iain Borden's book can be found here: amzn.to/32R6Ujb Or, order through your local bookstore! Skateboard magazine archives: Skateboarder Magazine 1964-1979 - skateboarding.transworld.net/skateboarder-magazine-archives/ Vintage Skateboard Magazines: vintageskateboardmagazines.com/new/magazines.html And linked here is a Google Doc listing every skate video we referenced with timecode: docs.google.com/document/d/1--FwIRD1MtsE5SrfZM-uyxoEetrp7iA4N5Q0kFJcW3Y/edit?usp=sharing Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The most notorious act of protest for women’s suffrage
The most notorious act of protest for women’s suffrage
3 måneder siden
In 1913, suffragette Emily Davison disrupted a major horse race in the name of winning British women the vote. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab British suffragettes in the early 20th century used spectacle and drama to draw attention to their fight to win women the vote. They delivered public speeches, marched, displayed colorful banners, and got thrown in jail, all in an effort to pressure legislators to extend suffrage to women. But after a violent clash with police in November 1910 - a day known as “Black Friday” - their tactics changed. They began committing random acts of property damage: smashing windows, setting fire to buildings, even destroying fine art on public display. The most radical act of destruction came in 1913, when militant suffragette Emily Wilding Davison threw herself under King George V’s racehorse at a major public event. She died of her injuries and became a suffragette martyr. Ultimately, her funeral procession ended up being one of the largest, and last, major demonstrations by the militant suffragettes. World War I interrupted their protests, and women over 30 won the vote in 1918, when the war ended. If you or someone you know is considering self-harm, please seek help through the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Note: The headline for this piece has been updated. Previous title: How British suffragettes fought for the vote Darkroom is a history and photography series that anchors each episode around a single image. Analyzing what the photo shows (or doesn't show) provides context that helps unravel a wider story. Watch previous episodes here: noburn.info/id/video/ypjMgK59pa1qpKA.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How slow motion works
How slow motion works
3 måneder siden
This video is sponsored by Raycon. To get 15% off, click here: buyraycon.com/vox Slow motion is a key part of modern visual culture, from iPhone selfies to movies. So how does it work? Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores how slow motion works and how it became a part of movie history. It’s a history that starts at the very beginning of photography, when pioneers like Étienne-Jules Marey and Eadweard Muybridge discovered that capturing images required capturing motion, too. Slow motion was key in the silent film days, in which camera operators would overcrank their cameras (slowing down footage) or undercrank (speeding it up). These experiments could range from goofy to dreamy. Soon after the addition of sound, Hollywood embraced a standard speed for movies - and slow motion became an even more important tool. As the video shows, it showed up in sports reels, movie musicals, and artsy French dramas. And before long, it was part of the action movie landscape too, from Seven Samurai to Bonnie and Clyde. Today, we take for granted that slow motion is one of the available tools to moviemakers, whether they’re working on an iPhone or a Hollywood set. And it probably won’t stop anytime soon. Further reading This issue of American Cinematographer is a time capsule look at the adoption of the key sound film technology used in early movies, Vitaphone. archive.org/details/americancinemato07amer/page/n37/mode/2up?q=24 Most academic writing that touches on slow-mo focuses on individual filmmakers, like this essay by scholar Ludovic Cortade. www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46n14t.13?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents Finally, if you really want to nerd out on film history, this is a copy of the Transactions of the Society of Motion Picture Engineers, in which they started developing a frame rate standard and discussed synchronization of sound and film. archive.org/details/transactionsofso29soci/page/294/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The fight for America's 51st state, explained
The fight for America's 51st state, explained
3 måneder siden
Washington, DC is closer than ever to becoming a state. Could it actually happen? Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO On June 26, 2020, the US House of Representatives voted to make America’s capital city, Washington, DC, the country’s 51st state. It was a historic vote, and the closest the country has come to adding a new state in over 60 years. But it was also, for the time being, completely symbolic. Because at least in 2020, DC has no chance of actually becoming a state. That June 26 vote was almost entirely along party lines; Democrats mostly voted in favor of DC statehood, and Republicans against it. That’s because making DC a state would give the Democrats additional seats in Congress, potentially affecting the balance of power between the parties. It’s why President Trump and the Republican-controlled Senate have both promised to strike down any bid for DC statehood. And in fact, statehood in the US has always been a political issue. In the past, the US has often added states in pairs to preserve the political balance. Admitting a new state on its own has happened, but it’s unusual. But the case for DC statehood is strong: The city has a similar population to several states, its hundreds of thousands of residents lack any say in national lawmaking, and its local government is uniquely vulnerable to being strong-armed by Congress and the federal government. Simply put, the laws that created the district did not anticipate that it would one day be a major city. And while in 1993, the last time Congress voted on DC statehood, the Democratic-controlled House failed to pass it, today’s Democratic Party is increasingly on board with it. If 2020’s election puts the Democrats in full control of the federal government, America might actually get its 51st state. Further reading: More on how the US has added new states in the past: www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/9/18/20863026/dc-statehood-george-floyd-puerto-rico-statehood What it would take for DC to become a state: www.vox.com/2020/6/22/21293168/dc-statehood-vote-filibuster-supreme-court-joe-biden How Congress has interfered with DC: www.dcvote.org/ending-congressional-interference And a history of why the idea of a federal district is written in the constitution: www.nationalgeographic.com/history/reference/united-states-history/why-washington-dc-not-state-started-drunken-mob/ Note: The headline on this piece has been updated. Previous headline: Why Washington, DC isn't a state Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why scientists are so worried about this glacier
Why scientists are so worried about this glacier
4 måneder siden
It's at the heart of Antarctica and on the verge of collapse. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Man-made climate change is warming the planet's atmosphere and oceans, and the effects are being felt the most at the poles. In Antarctica, home to the largest chunk of ice on earth, ice shelves and glaciers are beginning to collapse, and one in particular could spell disaster. The Thwaites Glacier, in West Antarctica, has retreated more than 14 kilometers in the last two decades as warm ocean water undermines it. The glacier is situated on a downward slope that falls deep into the center of Antarctica. It's why scientists are racing to find out how close it is to total collapse - and what that would mean for future sea levels. Further Reading: The Doomsday Glacier, Rolling Stone Magazine: www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-features/the-doomsday-glacier-113792/ The Race to Understand Antarctica's Most Terrifying Glacier, Wired: www.wired.com/story/antarctica-thwaites-glacier-breaking-point/ Into the Thaw, PRI www.pri.org/categories/thaw-decoding-thwaites-glacier International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration: thwaitesglacier.org/ Dustin Schroeder, Stanford University: earth.stanford.edu/people/dustin-schroeder Sridhar Anandakrishnan, Penn State University www.geosc.psu.edu/academic-faculty/anandakrishnan-sridhar Vox Atlas demonstrates where conflicts occur on a map and the ways in which foreign policy shapes a region. Watch all the episodes here: bit.ly/2SThVsf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The story behind this iconic Olympics protest
The story behind this iconic Olympics protest
3 måneder siden
Tommie Smith and John Carlos’s 1968 US national anthem protest, explained. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The image of sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos raising their fists during a medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City is an enduring image of silent protest. But the key to understanding it goes beyond the black-gloved fists. All three medal winners, including silver medalist Peter Norman of Australia, wore buttons that read “Olympic Project for Human Rights.” The Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) was a coalition of prominent athletes formed in 1967 that threatened to boycott participating in the upcoming Olympic games, in order to draw attention to systemic racism in the United States. The group, led by professor Harry Edwards, ultimately voted to compete in the games and hold their demonstrations there, which led to the now-iconic display on the medal stand following the men’s 200-meter final. This act got Smith and Carlos kicked off the team, but left a lasting legacy on making political statements through sport. Additional reading: The Revolt of the Black Athlete, by Dr. Harry Edwards archive.org/details/TheRevoltOfTheBlackAthlete Darkroom is a history and photography series that anchors each episode around a single image. Analyzing what the photo shows (or doesn't show) provides context that helps unravel a wider story. Watch previous episodes here: noburn.info/id/video/ypjMgK59pa1qpKA.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How humans are making pandemics more likely
How humans are making pandemics more likely
3 måneder siden
It’s never been easier for animal pathogens to spill over into humans. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Over the last 40 years, disease outbreaks among humans have become more and more frequent. The majority of those diseases are zoonoses, or diseases that originated in animals, like Ebola, West Nile virus, and probably Covid-19. But what makes zoonotic outbreaks likelier than ever is actually something humans are doing. According to science journalist Sonia Shah, author of the 2017 book "Pandemic," the expansion of humans onto more and more of the planet’s land has increased the likelihood of disease outbreaks in two ways. First, as humans move into what were once animal habitats, we end up living closer to animals that might contain dangerous pathogens; and second, as we destroy or alter animal habitats, we’re driving away or killing off animals that once served as a “firewall” between those pathogens and us. And the human land development driving this trend shows no signs of stopping. Correction: At 4:28 and 4:49 we mistakenly depict the European robin. The species actually responsible for the spread of West Nile virus in North America is the American robin. Further reading: Vox’s Sigal Samuel interviews Sonia Shah: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2020/3/31/21199917/coronavirus-covid-19-animals-pandemic-environment-climate-biodiversity Sonia Shah’s book Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond soniashah.com/pandemic-the-book/ The World Health Organization’s retrospective on the 2014 Ebola outbreak: www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/ebola-6-months/guinea/en/ World Wildlife Fund 2018 Living Planet Report: c402277.ssl.cf1.rackcdn.com/publications/1187/files/original/LPR2018_Full_Report_Spreads.pdf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
A brief history of police impunity in Black deaths
A brief history of police impunity in Black deaths
4 måneder siden
Black Americans are more likely to be killed by police. The police are rarely held accountable. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab On May 25, 2020, Minneapolis police officers killed an unarmed black man named George Floyd. After video of Floyd’s death spread on the internet, protesters filled the streets across the US, demanding an end to police brutality and a reckoning with the unequal treatment of Black Americans, but also with another, more direct demand: That his killers be punished. Until recent years, there was no reliable data on how many people in the US were killed by police every year, or on the legal outcomes of those killings. But data collected by the Mapping Police Violence project provides some answers, including one that has held steady every year for which we have data: Police are almost never charged with killing someone, and are even less often convicted. The data shows that less than 3% of police killings lead to the officer being charged with a crime, and fewer than 1% of them result in a conviction, and that these rates are the same regardless of the victim’s race. But it also shows that a Black American is three times more likely to be killed by police than a white American. Here’s Mapping Police Violence’s data, which we rely on throughout the video: mappingpoliceviolence.org/ The Washington Post also keeps a record of deaths caused by police shootings, which had similar findings: www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/investigations/police-shootings-database/ An interview with a historian on the history on police brutality: www.vox.com/2020/6/6/21280643/police-brutality-violence-protests-racism-khalil-muhammad Vox also interviewed experts on ways to reform American policing: www.vox.com/2020/6/1/21277013/police-reform-policies-systemic-racism-george-floyd The headline for this video has been updated, it was changed from: A timeline of 1,944 Black Americans killed by police. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why the US has so many Filipino nurses
Why the US has so many Filipino nurses
4 måneder siden
The US colonized a country and built a labor supply. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Filipino nurses have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus in the US. That’s because they make up an outsized portion of the nursing workforce. About one-third of all foreign-born nurses in the US are Filipino. Since 1960, 150,000 Filipino nurses have come to work in the US. And that’s because over the past century the US built a pipeline that draws nurses from the Philippines every time it faces a shortage. This system began in the early 20th century when the US invaded and colonized the Philippines and lives on through today. To understand the long history behind the large presence of Filipino nurses in the US and how and why it continues to this very day, watch the video above. And let us know what you think in the comments! If you want to learn more, here are some additional resources you can check out: For a more in-depth look at the toll the coronavirus is taking on Filipino nurses check out the ProPublica piece ““Similar to Times of War”: The Staggering Toll of COVID-19 on Filipino Health Care Workers” www.propublica.org/article/similar-to-times-of-war-the-staggering-toll-of-covid-19-on-filipino-health-care-workers To browse more archive images of Filipino nurses check out this great digital exhibit by Ren Capucao, who was our main source of archival images for this video: uva.digication.com/ren.capucao/exhibition If you want to learn more about the history of Filipino nurses and the US check out this article by Catherine Ceniza Choy, featured in our video: www.zocalopublicsquare.org/2019/09/30/why-are-there-so-many-filipino-nurses-in-california/ideas/essay/ If you want to go even deeper, here is her book-length study “Empire of Care”: www.dukeupress.edu/empire-of-care To understand the colonial history of the Philippines, that starts well before the US invasion, with the Spanish colonization in the 16th century, you can start here: www.asianstudies.org/publications/eaa/archives/the-philippines-an-overview-of-the-colonial-era/ To get a snapshot of the crucial role immigrant health care workers play in staffing the US health care system, here’s a study filled with insightful data by the Migration Policy Institute: www.migrationpolicy.org/article/immigrant-health-care-workers-united-states And for anyone looking to dig deeper into Filipino American history in the US, here is a link to the Filipino American National Historical Society: fanhs-national.org/filam/ Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What "defund the police" really means
What "defund the police" really means
4 måneder siden
It's not as radical as it sounds. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Among those protesting police brutality in the US, there is a slogan that’s taken hold: “defund the police.” The key idea is a push to move the billions of dollars we spend on police in the US, to social services and other public spending. The disparities between policing budgets and those of other city agencies are massive. And while defunding the police might sound radical, it’s a policy activists have been talking about for decades. For some, it can mean reforms that simply lessen the police role in society, while for others - the slogan is a call to abolish the system and create something new entirely. These ideas have all converged into the popular “defund the police” slogan, and the renewed energy around the movement is working. For further reading: www.vox.com/21291901/nypd-billion-de-blasio-defund-police-reform www.vox.com/2020/6/23/21299118/defunding-the-police-minneapolis-budget-george-floyd populardemocracy.org/news/publications/freedom-thrive-reimagining-safety-security-our-communities www.urban.org/policy-centers/cross-center-initiatives/state-and-local-finance-initiative/state-and-local-backgrounders/police-and-corrections-expenditures Sources: NYC budget: www1.nyc.gov/assets/omb/downloads/pdf/erc4-20.pdf Chicago budget: www.chicago.gov/content/dam/city/depts/obm/supp_info/2020Budget/2020BUDGETORDINANCE.pdf On arrest numbers in the US: www.vera.org/publications/arrest-trends-every-three-seconds-landing/arrest-trends-every-three-seconds/overview ACLU report on police in schools: www.aclu.org/issues/juvenile-justice/school-prison-pipeline/cops-and-no-counselors Body camera research: bwc.thelab.dc.gov/TheLabDC_MPD_BWC_Working_Paper_10.20.17.pdf Memphis data: crime-data-explorer.fr.cloud.gov/explorer/agency/TNMPD0000/pe Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What's in a name? A lot, actually. [Advertiser content from Qatar Foundation]
What's in a name? A lot, actually. [Advertiser content from Qatar Foundation]
4 måneder siden
Almost everyone has school memories of the student - or students - who had to bear the brunt of having a name that others couldn’t, or wouldn’t, correctly pronounce. A name that was different from their peers, or “difficult” for a teacher to say out loud. But the question is, different from what, and why was the pronunciation challenging? A name like Kholoud may raise an eyebrow in the United States, but in many Arabic-speaking countries, the name is much more common. Learn more here - www.vox.com/ad/21272071/name-mispronunciation-student-education-microaggression-classroom
Why America's police look like soldiers
Why America's police look like soldiers
4 måneder siden
Why are the police bringing military assault rifles to protests? And where did they get them? Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Across the country, Americans protesting racial injustice and police brutality - the overwhelming majority of them peacefully - have been met by police forces that look more like an army. Officers have shown up to protests with riot gear, armored trucks, and military rifles. This is what America’s police now look like, and it’s the result of a decades-long buildup of military equipment among the country’s police departments. It began as a Reagan-era program to give police departments more resources to fight the War on Drugs, and has escalated ever since. Today, the idea of a militarized police force is baked into how American police see themselves. Read more about the history of police militarization: www.cato.org/publications/white-paper/overkill-rise-paramilitary-police-raids-america More on the history of the 1033 program: www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR2400/RR2464/RAND_RR2464.pdf And read more of Arthur Rizer’s research here: www.rstreet.org/2020/05/26/the-evolution-of-modern-use-of-force-policies-and-the-need-for-professionalism-in-policing/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why locusts are descending on East Africa
Why locusts are descending on East Africa
4 måneder siden
This video is sponsored by ExpressVPN. To find out how to get three months free, click here: ExpressVPN.com/Vox In a region where food is already scarce, billions of insects are now eating everything in sight. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Since late 2019, East Africa and the Middle East have been experiencing their worst locust outbreaks in decades. A small locust swarm can eat more food than 35,000 people; but some locust swarms in the area have grown to over two thousand times that size. And it’s all coming right on the heels of a season of catastrophic flooding in the region. But that isn’t a coincidence: The desert locust thrives when dry weather turns wet. And in 2018 and 2019, a series of freak weather events brought record-setting rainfall to the Middle East and East Africa. The result of all this is a region at risk of a famine, in the middle of a pandemic. And because freak weather is a hallmark of climate change, it’s also the kind of thing we can expect to happen again. Further reading / watching: Read Vox.com science reporter Umair Irfan’s article on the locust outbreak: www.vox.com/2020/5/20/21158283/locust-plague-swarm-outbreak-africa-asia-2020 One of the things that helped prime the region for locusts was an unusually strong Indian Ocean Dipole. Watch our piece about that here: noburn.info/id/video/uI27asWZoZudeHo.html For more information on the locust upsurge, see the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization’s website: www.fao.org/ag/locusts/en/info/info/986/index.html And this FAO press conference from February helped me answer a lot of the questions in this piece: noburn.info/id/video/mXyofKZykZujcJg.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why all Americans should honor Juneteenth
Why all Americans should honor Juneteenth
4 måneder siden
An historian explains the history and significance of the holiday. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Note: This video was previously titled, "Juneteenth, explained." The title has been changed to better reflect the video's content. When American schoolchildren learn about chattel slavery in the US, we’re often told it ended with Abraham Lincoln’s signature on the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. But, as late as June 19, 1865, enslaved people in Texas were still held in bondage. On that date, the Federal troops entered the state and began to punish slave holders and former confederates who refused to obey the law. “Juneteenth is a deeply emotional moment for enslaved people,” says historian Karlos K. Hill, of the University of Oklahoma. In Texas and across the country, emancipated African Americans began celebrating annually, with parades, concerts, and picnics. “Being able to go wherever they want and being able to wander about; for enslaved people, it was an expression of their freedom,” says Hill. “Formerly enslaved people celebrating, in public, their newfound freedom, was an act of resistance.” However, by 1877, the Federal government had largely abandoned the South. The lynching era- when hundreds of African Americans were killed by white mobs each year across the North and the South- began soon after. Today, Dr. Hill says, commemorating Juneteenth is important for all Americans because it helps us see all the ways that slavery still shapes this country, including, as he says, “the desire to master and dominate black bodies.” Sources/further reading Why celebrating Juneteenth is more important now than ever (P.R. Lockhart, Vox, 2018) www.vox.com/identities/2018/6/19/17476482/juneteenth-holiday-emancipation-african-american-celebration-history The Impact of Lynching on Black Culture and Memory: The Impact of Lynching on Black Culture and Memory (Karlos K. Hill, Cambridge University Press, 2016) The Murder of Emmett Till: A Graphic History (Karlos K. Hill and Dave Dodson, Cambridge University Press, 2020) Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror (Equal Justice Initiative, 2017) eji.org/reports/lynching-in-america/ The National Museum of African American History and Culture- online collection: nmaahc.si.edu/explore/collection Portraits of African American ex-slaves from the U.S. Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers’ Project slave narratives collections (Library of Congress) www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2001696353/ Voices Remembering Slavery: Freed People Tell Their Stories (Library of Congress) www.loc.gov/collections/voices-remembering-slavery/ Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936 to 1938 (Library of Congress) www.loc.gov/collections/slave-narratives-from-the-federal-writers-project-1936-to-1938/ African American Spirituals (Library of Congress) www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200197495/ Florida Memory: State Library and Archives of Florida floridamemory.com/ New Georgia Encyclopedia (Georgia Humanities) www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/ Austin History Center General Collection Photographs in The Portal to Texas History. University of North Texas Libraries. texashistory.unt.edu/explore/collections/AHCP/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why American farmers are throwing out tons of milk
Why American farmers are throwing out tons of milk
4 måneder siden
The coronavirus supply chain problem, explained through milk. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Coronavirus continues to infect nearly every aspect of American life - on US farms, it’s led to the widespread destruction of fresh food. Take milk, for example. Dairy farmers across the country have dumped millions of gallons of fresh milk. This, at a time when millions of Americans are dealing with food insecurity. Since so many schools and businesses are now closed, dairy farmers have nowhere to direct those products. Check out the video above to learn more about this break in the food supply chain, and why it’s not easy to redirect supply that was going to schools and businesses to consumers or food banks instead. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Empty middle seats on planes won't stop the coronavirus
Empty middle seats on planes won't stop the coronavirus
4 måneder siden
An empty seat won’t prevent transmission, but it might help a little. Check out this episode of our new Quibi show, Answered. There's a new episode daily you can watch here: link.quibi.com/answeredbyvoxyt As coronavirus lockdowns loosen, flights are starting to fill up - leading many people to call for empty middle seats. Keeping middle seats open on a plane can help maintain physical distance between passengers. But it’s unlikely to prevent virus transmission; there are many other ways coronavirus can spread on an airplane. One thing’s for sure, though: a vacant middle seat will definitely affect how much we pay to fly. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
Why this font is everywhere
Why this font is everywhere
4 måneder siden
How Cooper Black became pop culture’s favorite font. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO There’s a typeface that has made a resurgence in the last couple of years. It’s appeared on hip hop album covers, food packaging, and advertising. Perhaps you know it from the Garfield comics, Tootsie Roll logo, or the Pet Sounds album cover by the Beach Boys. It's called Cooper Black, and its popularity and ubiquity has never waned in the hundred years since it was first designed. In the video above, Steven Heller and Bethany Heck tell the story of Cooper Black and deconstruct all the reasons it's been pop culture's favorite font for so long. Sources: Design literacy: Understanding graphic design. Steven Heller, 2014. The Book of Oz Cooper: an Appreciation of Oswald Bruce Cooper. Society of Typographic Arts, 1949. Font Review Journal: fontreviewjournal.com/cooper/ Fonts In Use: fontsinuse.com/typefaces/7357/cooper-black Letterform Archive: oa.letterformarchive.org/ Printing Films: printingfilms.com/ Museum of Printing: museumofprinting.org/ International Advertising and Design Database: magazines.iaddb.org/ Archive.org: archive.org/details/magazine_rack Cornell University Library Hip hop collection: rmc.library.cornell.edu/hiphop/flyers.php Additional sources: Getty Images / Shutterstock / Google Books Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The 1850s map that changed how we fight outbreaks
The 1850s map that changed how we fight outbreaks
4 måneder siden
It all starts with a pump. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores Dr. John Snow’s map of the Broad Street Pump, which changed epidemiology forever. In 1854, news spread about a mysterious new cholera outbreak in London. At the time, doctors and scientists largely believed the disease traveled in a “miasma” - a floating cloud of sickness. Dr. John Snow suspected bad water might actually be the agent of transmission - and he wanted to prove it in time to stop the outbreak. Through a mix of personal interviews, clever detective work, and data analysis that included tables and a famous map, Snow managed to stop the outbreak and convince local public health officials, eventually, that cholera could be transmitted through water, not a miasma. Since his breakthrough study, the map has become an iconic piece of epidemiological history, as an illustration of keen detective work, analysis, and visual representation with a map that, even today, tells a story. Watch the above video to learn more. Further Reading: Cholera, chloroform, and the science of medicine : a life of John Snow archive.org/details/cholerachlorofor00pete This lengthy academic study of John Snow’s life and work follows his career as a pioneering anesthesiologist as well as his work on cholera. It clears up a lot of misconceptions about his influence and work and gives you a bit of a picture of snow as a person (he was a teetotaler and vegetarian - both unusual for the time). Cartographies of disease : maps, mapping, and medicine archive.org/details/cartographiesofd0000koch/page/100/mode/2up Tom Koch’s history of disease mapping is a great overview of the discipline. It shows how the practice existed before Snow, how Snow’s map changed and influenced the field (and how it didn’t), and how far disease mapping has come since. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why it's so hard to get unemployment benefits
Why it's so hard to get unemployment benefits
4 måneder siden
It's not the computers. It's the politicians behind them. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Millions of Americans across the country have lost their jobs. But whether or not those people can get the unemployment benefits they deserve actually depends on where they live. In some states, more than two thirds of jobless people typically collect unemployment benefits. But in others, like Florida, fewer than one in 10 unemployed people get those benefits. That massive difference has often been blamed on technology; Florida’s unemployment system is notoriously difficult to use. But technology doesn’t build itself. The real explanation requires a look at the ideology of the people who did. Sources/further reading: Ain’t No Sunshine: Fewer than One in Eight Unemployed Workers In Florida Is Receiving Unemployment Insurance (National Employment Law Project, 2015) s27147.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/Aint-No-Sunshine-Florida-Unemployment-Insurance.pdf Long Lines for Unemployment: How Did We Get Here and What Do We Do Now? (National Employment Law Project, April 2020) s27147.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/Long-Lines-Unemployment.pdf Reemployment Assistance Claims and Benefits Information System (State of Florida Auditor General, March 2019) flauditor.gov/pages/pdf_files/2019-183.pdf The Automation of State Unemployment Systems (Corporate Cost Control, 2014) www.corporatecostcontrol.com/2014/09/09/whats-new-the-automation-of-state-unemployment-systems/ Florida blames troubled unemployment website entirely on vendor; feds heading here to help (Tampa Bay Times, 2014) www.tampabay.com/news/business/feds-heading-to-florida-to-help-fix-troubled-unemployment-website/2161122/ Not all unemployed people get unemployment benefits; in some states, very few do (Pew Research Center, April 2020) www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/04/24/not-all-unemployed-people-get-unemployment-benefits-in-some-states-very-few-do/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The eclipse photo that made Einstein famous
The eclipse photo that made Einstein famous
4 måneder siden
In 1919, a total solar eclipse helped redefine gravity. Thanks to Raycon for sponsoring this video. Check them out at buyraycon.com/vox Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity, published in 1915, defined gravity as the influence of massive objects, like planets and stars, curving space around them. This was very different from the way Isaac Newton had defined gravity over 200 years earlier: Newton described an attracting force that kept planets and stars in orbit with each other. If Einstein was right, then light would also bend near massive objects. And in 1919, two British expeditions set out to test it by photographing a total solar eclipse. By comparing the position of stars with the sun in front of them and another with the sun elsewhere, Arthur Eddington and his team proved that the stars’ apparent positions moved during the eclipse. This was the first, but not the last time Einstein’s theory of general relativity was tested and proven, and Einstein became a celebrity overnight. He remained a pop culture icon for the rest of his life. Further reading: A determination of the deflection of light by the sun's gravitational field, from observations made at the total eclipse of May 29, 1919 (Dyson, Eddington, Davidson, 1920): w.astro.berkeley.edu/~kalas/labs/documents/dyson1920.pdf Eclipse 1919.org: eclipse1919.org/ Darkroom is a history and photography series that anchors each episode around a single image. Analyzing what the photo shows (or doesn't show) provides context that helps unravel a wider story. Watch previous episodes here: noburn.info/id/video/ypjMgK59pa1qpKA.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The most urgent threat of deepfakes isn't politics
The most urgent threat of deepfakes isn't politics
4 måneder siden
The real threat of deepfakes, explained with Kristen Bell. Join the Open Sourced Reporting Network: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork Actress Kristen Bell first found out there were deepfake porn videos of her online from her husband, actor Dax Shepherd. In the videos, her face has been manipulated onto porn stars’ bodies. “I was just shocked,” the actress told Vox. “It's hard to think about that I'm being exploited.” And this isn’t only happening to celebrities. Noelle Martin, a recent law graduate in Perth, Australia, discovered that someone took photos she’d shared on social media and used them first to photoshop her face into nude images, and then to create deepfake videos. Deepfakes are often portrayed as a political threat - fake videos of politicians making comments they never made. But in a recent report, the research group Deeptrace found that 96% of deepfakes found online are pornographic. Of those videos, virtually all are of women. And virtually all are made without their consent. Sources: "The State of Deepfakes" deeptracelabs.com/resources/ Defining "Deepfake" www.theverge.com/2018/5/22/17380306/deepfake-definition-ai-manipulation-fake-news "Deepfakes and Cheapfakes: The Manipulation of Audio and Visual Evidence" datasociety.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/DS_Deepfakes_Cheap_FakesFinal-1.pdf "An Introduction to Neural Networks and Autoencoders" www.alanzucconi.com/2018/03/14/an-introduction-to-autoencoders/ "Deep Fakes: A Looming Challenge for Privacy, Democracy, and National Security" papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3213954 Open Sourced is a year-long reporting project from Recode by Vox that goes deep into the closed ecosystems of data, privacy, algorithms, and artificial intelligence. Learn more at www.vox.com/opensourced Join the Open Sourced Reporting Network: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork This project is made possible by the Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists. Watch all episodes of Open Sourced right here on NOburn: bit.ly/2tIHftD Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Protests aren't what they look like on TV
Protests aren't what they look like on TV
4 måneder siden
What protest news coverage does - and doesn't - show you. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery have ignited protests around the world. Those protests have dominated news coverage. But when it comes to communicating the protests’ scale, character, and purpose, a lot of that coverage falls short. Part of that is because of the media’s incentive to highlight the most dramatic imagery; it’s why so much protest coverage has been filled with violent and chaotic scenes of fire, looters, and tear gas. But it’s also because of the nature of protest imagery itself. In this video, journalism professor Jason Johnson and Vox editor Kainaz Amaria explain that, while the news can show you what a protest looks like, it’s a lot worse at telling you why it’s happening. Further reading: www.vox.com/first-person/2020/5/29/21274891/george-floyd-cop-arrested-minneapolis-breonna-taylor Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How deadly is Covid-19?
How deadly is Covid-19?
4 måneder siden
Making sense of the coronavirus death toll. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/04/21/world/coronavirus-missing-deaths.html ourworldindata.org/mortality-risk-covid www.governor.ny.gov/news/amid-ongoing-covid-19-pandemic-governor-cuomo-launches-new-initiative-expand-access-testing-low www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/covid/covid-19-data.page There are two ways you could assess the deadliness of a crisis like the novel coronavirus pandemic. One is to ask, “How many people are dying?” And the other is to ask, “What is the risk of dying if you contract the virus?” For months, public health officials were unable to fully answer either of those questions. Now, with death certificates and antibody-survey data coming in, we’re slowly getting a better picture of Covid-19 mortality. As we explain in this video, that picture is of a disease that’s killing more people than we knew, but a lower percentage of those infected. Most places are looking at a higher death count and lower death rate than previously reported. But the biggest challenge in assessing a tragedy like this is that we’re still inside it - and nobody can predict how many lives will be lost before it ends. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why tigers get coronavirus but your dog will be fine
Why tigers get coronavirus but your dog will be fine
5 måneder siden
Check out this episode of our new Quibi show, Answered. There's a new episode daily you can watch here: link.quibi.com/answeredbyvoxyt We have seen reports of everything from Malayan tigers to pugs testing positive for COVID-19. In this episode, we explore which animals can contract and transmit the coronavirus, and whether or not we should be worried about our pets. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
How coronavirus spreads outdoors vs. indoors
How coronavirus spreads outdoors vs. indoors
5 måneder siden
Can a runner give you Covid-19? Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO If you want to stay totally safe from Covid-19, and eliminate the risk of either getting it or transmitting it, you have to stay home. But as the weather gets warmer, public places start to open up, and many places enter their fourth month of life under coronavirus, that’s becoming less and less realistic. At the same time, we know that coronavirus can be transmitted through the air -- and that raises some pretty big questions. Is it safe to go the beach? What about a park? Is a heavy-breathing runner going to infect you as they pass you? In short: How do you go outside safely? Read Vox reporter Sigal Samuel’s article about the risks of transmitting Covid-19 outdoors: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2020/4/24/21233226/coronavirus-runners-cyclists-airborne-infectious-dose A helpful chart for thinking through the risks of different scenarios when it comes to Covid-19: www.vox.com/2020/5/22/21266756/coronavirus-pandemic-covid-risks-social-distancing-chart The CDC’s study about the Guangzhou restaurant where one person transmitted the virus to several others: wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/26/7/20-0764_article And the study of the 318 outbreaks in China: www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.04.20053058v1 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What Bill Gates hopes we learn from coronavirus
What Bill Gates hopes we learn from coronavirus
5 måneder siden
Vox interviewed Bill Gates in 2015 about his fears of a global pandemic. Now that we’re living in that reality, what does he think comes next? Watch our 2015 interview with Bill Gates here: noburn.info/id/video/n3Wofq-mlK5tp2E.html This interview was conducted on April 25, 2020. You can listen to the rest of the interview on the Ezra Klein Show, available wherever you listen to podcasts, or read it here: bit.ly/2TCZx9O For more information on The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s efforts to fight coronavirus: bit.ly/3elJyog For more of our sources: The latest data on the pandemic around the world: ourworldindata.org/coronavirus WHO data on SARS’ spread: www.who.int/csr/sars/country/2003_07_11/en/ WHO MERS Case count: www.who.int/csr/don/07-july-2015-mers-korea/en/ For much more on the effectiveness on the USA’s efforts against HIV/AIDS in Africa, also known as PEPFAR, Dylan Matthews has written about it here: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2018/12/12/18136716/pepfar-hiv-aids-trump-congress The specific research on PEPFAR’s effectiveness shown on screen is: med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2012/05/740000-lives-saved-study-documents-benefits-of-aids-relief-program.html Archival footage of the United Nations from: archive.org/details/4077_United_Nations_and_World_Disputes And from the signing of the Bretton Woods agreement, ratifying the World Bank and IMF, via Getty Images. For more about about the Bretton Woods story: www.vox.com/2014/8/24/6057119/harry-dexter-white-ben-steil Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The US tested the wrong people for coronavirus
The US tested the wrong people for coronavirus
5 måneder siden
And you can tell because of a number called the test positivity rate. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab As the rate of new coronavirus cases in the US slows down, many states and cities there are encouraging businesses to open again, easing the lockdowns that have been in place since March. But public health experts warn that in many of those places, opening up is premature. The reason is that throughout the US, as well as in many other countries, we still don’t really know how many people have the virus, or where they are. That’s dangerous because it means infected people who don’t feel sick are probably mingling with the rest of the population, which could enable further outbreaks. And the only way to really prevent that is by proactively testing people for covid-19 until the people who have it have been tracked down and isolated. The US started testing its population for covid-19 very slowly, but it’s since ramped testing up, and by early May was performing over 200,000 tests a day. Unfortunately, there’s no magic number of tests that is “enough” to contain an outbreak. The important thing is to test the right people - and to evaluate whether that’s happening, public health officials recommend looking at a different number: The percentage of tests coming back positive. It’s called the test positivity rate. Note: The headline on this piece has been updated. Previous headline: What the US needs to do to open up safely In a previous version of this video, the circles in the infographic at 5:50 and 6:20 were incorrectly sized. The error has been corrected. Sources: Our World in Data is a reliable source for country-by-country covid-19 data: ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer?yScale=log&zoomToSelection=true&deathsMetric=true&dailyFreq=true&aligned=true&smoothing=7&country=USA+GBR+CAN+BRA+AUS+IND+ESP+DEU+FRA+RUS Our World in Data also has weekly-rolling test-positivity rate data which gives a better snapshot of where countries are currently at: ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-testing We based our state test-positivity rates on this May 6 Harvard Global Health Institute and NPR analysis: www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/05/07/851610771/u-s-coronavirus-testing-still-falls-short-hows-your-state-doing The Atlantic’s coverage of the importance of test-positivity rates: www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2020/04/us-coronavirus-outbreak-out-control-test-positivity-rate/610132/ An important disclaimer on potential inflation in testing numbers at the national and state level in the US: www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/05/cdc-and-states-are-misreporting-covid-19-test-data-pennsylvania-georgia-texas/611935/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
One reason why coronavirus hits Black people the hardest
One reason why coronavirus hits Black people the hardest
5 måneder siden
Toxic air can weaponize the coronavirus. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Across the US, black people are dying from Covid-19 at disproportionately high rates. While there are many different factors at play behind the stark racial disparities - there’s one possible reason that’s been lurking in the air for decades: pollution. The long history of segregation and housing discrimination has long put black people at greater risk of living near chemical plants, factories and highways, exposing them to higher levels of air pollutants. These pollutants have had a chronically negative impact on health, leading to conditions like hypertension and asthma. Now, those same diseases are associated with severe cases of Covid-19, and showing that where you live can determine whether you survive from Covid-19. Read the full study on air pollution exposure and Covid-19 mortality: projects.iq.harvard.edu/covid-pm Read the study on historic redlining and emergency room visits due to asthma: www.thelancet.com/journals/lanplh/article/PIIS2542-5196(19)30241-4/fulltext Read the study on Disparities in Distribution of Particulate Matter Emission Sources by Race and Poverty Status: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5844406/ To learn more about the experiences of residents in St. John the Baptist Parish, check out the Concerned Citizens of St. John website: www.ccosj.com/ To learn more about some of the air pollution risks in the Midwest, check out the Environmental Law & Policy Center: elpc.org/. They also run an air monitoring site for Chicago that highlights some of these disparities: airqualitychicago.org/ Read more about Cancer Alley from ProPublica/ The Times-Picayune and The Advocate: www.nola.com/news/environment/article_49fe4540-f74a-11e9-8d20-eb0f97323b91.html projects.propublica.org/louisiana-toxic-air/ And The Guardian: www.theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2019/may/06/cancertown-louisana-reserve-special-report A lot of our data comes from the National Air Toxics Assessment Cancer Risk map, which you can check out through the EPA: ejscreen.epa.gov/mapper/ The Covid Tracking Project also regularly compiles Covid-19 data on race: covidtracking.com/race Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The real story behind this war poster
The real story behind this war poster
5 måneder siden
Rosie the riveter is iconic. But what’s the real story behind the poster? Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the story behind the women riveters of World War II. During World War II, millions of women entered manufacturing and the workforce in general. How did the labor pool change so dramatically, so quickly? And how does it connect to the familiar poster of Rosie the riveter that people still love today? These riveters came from other industries and outside the workforce, guided with the help of private industry and some government agencies. The US Employment Service helped place men and women at wartime jobs, and the Women’s Bureau and War Manpower Commission helped find and train that labor. The traditional Rosie the riveter story is not without its omissions: white women benefited most from labor changes, and many of the riveters were already in the labor force before World War II began. But in a significant way, World War II did change work for women around the United States. Further Reading Karen Anderson’s Wartime Women (books.google.com/books/about/Wartime_Women.html?id=iSIqAAAAYAAJ) is the definitive book about Women’s Labor in World War II. It tells the story of the changing labor pool with extensive research into government, corporate, and union records. FRASER, the Federal Reserve’s Library, is one of the easiest places to find Women’s Bureau records and papers (it’s where the ones in this video were downloaded from). fraser.stlouisfed.org/author/united-states-women-s-bureau Creating Rosie the Riveter by Maureen Honey offers a peek into another aspect of wartime recruitment: propaganda distributed by the government to magazines and newspapers to promote the wartime agenda. books.google.com/books?id=3-OYWPKl-gUC&dq=riveters+world+war+ii&lr=&source=gbs_navlinks_s Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why beef is the worst food for the climate
Why beef is the worst food for the climate
5 måneder siden
Avoiding high-emission foods can have a bigger climate impact than any other consumption change. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Our consumption habits emit billions of tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Our diets account for one-fourth of those emissions. The food we eat emits so many greenhouse emissions because of the land it takes to grow it, but it also has something to do with biology. This video explains why the production of some foods emit more than others, and which foods to avoid to be a more climate-conscious consumer. This video was based on this chart, created by the University of Oxford’s Our World in Data: ourworldindata.org/food-choice-vs-eating-local Sources: For more Vox.com coverage of food emissions: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2020/2/20/21144017/local-food-carbon-footprint-climate-environment For more of Our World in Data’s data on the emissions related to food production: ourworldindata.org/environmental-impacts-of-food A lecture given by Joseph Poore, co-author of the study this chart was based on: noburn.info/id/video/nqHMgtdknYh_rGk.html Cow and sheep burping footage: noburn.info/id/video/2njNdtWKgm57fnY.html noburn.info/id/video/yILVd8ijqIGMpqA.html noburn.info/id/video/0ZuqhNV7dLKGbaA.html noburn.info/id/video/0m3cg8iHcaV5mJg.html noburn.info/id/video/3oCtor6cnp2hcHo.html noburn.info/id/video/soTQqMl0ep-ugH4.html noburn.info/id/video/mZqrm9GBgaRwfYY.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Dr. Anthony Fauci, explained
Dr. Anthony Fauci, explained
5 måneder siden
Where Dr. Fauci came from - and the crisis that shaped his career. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Correction: At 4:28, a previous version of this video read "Federal Drug Administration." It should read "Food and Drug Administration." Dr. Anthony Fauci has become one of the most recognizable faces of the United States’ coronavirus response, as a member of the Coronavirus Task Force and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. But it was an earlier crisis that shaped his career - and that’s crucial to understand his position today. As the above video shows, Dr. Fauci’s involvement in the AIDS crisis, from the virus’s discovery to the present day, has affected the course of his career and the way the disease is treated around the world. That history, in turn, informs how we learn about and treat the coronavirus today. In addition to scientific progress, AIDS also necessitated bureaucratic changes in the government response to the disease. By negotiating these challenges, Dr. Fauci secured his place in the public health system and changed how AIDS was treated. Further Reading: A topic as broad as the AIDS crisis, even narrowed to Dr. Fauci’s involvement, could have an endless reading list, from primary sources like ACT UP’s historical archive (actupny.org/documents/nyplPR.html) or one of Dr. Fauci’s early lectures on AIDs collections.nlm.nih.gov/catalog/nlm:nlmuid-101674642-vid. However, these books provide particularly useful context on a complex story. Against the Odds: The Story of of AIDS Drug Development, Politics, and Profits by Peter Arno and Karyn Feiden archive.org/details/againstodds00pete/page/258/mode/2up This book provides an exhaustive tour of the AIDS crisis from a drug research perspective, with extensive coverage of the NIH and FDA. Big Shot: Passion, Politics, and the Struggle for an AIDS Vaccine by Patricia Thomas archive.org/details/bigshotpassionpo00thom/ This book extends beyond the 1980s period covered in this video to explore the long search for an AIDS vaccine. It’s highly useful as a history of pharmaceutical and government efforts. How to Survive a Plague by David France www.google.com/books/edition/How_to_Survive_a_Plague/LIqxCwAAQBAJ This book, and the documentary of the same name, describe the activist history of the crisis with plenty of research into the government response. AIDS at 30: A History by Victoria Harden and Anthony A. Fauci www.google.com/books/edition/AIDS_at_30/QosAu8D4ELEC Written by a former NIH history director and Dr. Fauci, this is something like an “official” history of the AIDs crisis, from the beginning to the book’s 2012 publication date. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
8 million subscribers! + other things bringing us joy
8 million subscribers! + other things bringing us joy
5 måneder siden
Thank you to our 8 million subscribers for the most curious, surprising, and funny audience we could hope for! Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution: vox.com/contribute Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why we're seeing mass layoffs in the US but not the UK
Why we're seeing mass layoffs in the US but not the UK
5 måneder siden
Tens of millions of Americans are out of work because of the coronavirus. But it didn't have to be that way -- and it's not too late for the US to change course. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Few Americans alive today have ever seen unemployment numbers as bad as they are right now. At the end of April 2020, economists estimated that between 13 and 18 percent of US workers were unemployed. It's the highest rate since the Great Depression. That figure can seem somewhat inevitable; the unfortunate but unavoidable cost of economic lockdown. It’s why, in response, Congress has prioritized shoring up unemployment insurance benefits. But a handful of European countries have shown that mass unemployment isn’t a given in a situation like this. It’s a policy choice. In this video, we explain how and why the UK, Denmark, and the Netherlands chose a different path. With the help of economist Heidi Shierholz of the Economic Policy Institute, we explore whether the US can still avoid millions more job losses. Sources/further reading: The Nordic Way to Economic Rescue (NYT): www.nytimes.com/2020/03/28/business/nordic-way-economic-rescue-virus.html Keeping Business Alive: The Government as Buyer of Last Resort (Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman, UC Berkeley): gabriel-zucman.eu/files/coronavirus.pdf A ‘phase four’ relief and recovery package should provide economic assistance to state and local governments, extended unemployment benefits, and better protections for workers and jobs (Josh Bivens, Celine McNicholas, and Heidi Shierholz, Economic Policy Institute): www.epi.org/blog/a-phase-four-stimulus-package-should-provide-economic-assistance-to-state-and-local-governments-extended-unemployment-benefits-and-better-protections-for-workers-and-jobs/ Why Is America Choosing Mass Unemployment? (NYT): www.nytimes.com/2020/03/26/opinion/covid-economy-unemployment-europe.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article Coronavirus: Government to pay up to 80% of workers' wages (BBC): www.bbc.com/news/business-51982005 Social Security: Unemployment Insurance (VCU Social Welfare History Project): socialwelfare.library.vcu.edu/social-security/social-security-unemployment-insurance/ The Unemployment Rate Is Probably Around 13 Percent (NYT): www.nytimes.com/2020/04/03/upshot/coronavirus-jobless-rate-great-depression.html Jobless claims top 30 million as coronavirus continues to devastate economy (NBC News): www.nbcnews.com/business/economy/jobless-claims-top-30-million-coronavirus-continues-devastate-economy-n1196276 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
How voting by mail could save the US election
How voting by mail could save the US election
6 måneder siden
Coronavirus threatens the US election. Voting by mail could save it. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO On April 7, 2020, as the coronavirus held much of the US under lockdown, the state of Wisconsin held an election. Many other states had already decided to delay their spring elections to protect voters. But in Wisconsin, voters were forced to choose between participating in the election, and their own safety. Wisconsin's decision sparked outrage, but it also highlighted a question that the US really needs to figure out soon: How do you hold an election during a pandemic? Fortunately, there's actually a simple solution to this one: voting by mail. Tens of millions of Americans already vote this way, and if the rest of the US can prepare their election systems in time for the November election, they could avoid Wisconsin's fate. But time's running out. Read more from Dave Roberts on Vox.com: www.vox.com/science-and-health/2020/4/8/21209306/election-2020-vote-by-mail-wisconsin Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How coronavirus charts can mislead us
How coronavirus charts can mislead us
6 måneder siden
How to read a popular chart of coronavirus cases by country. Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution: vox.com/contribute Much of the data about the coronavirus epidemic and covid-19 is flawed. It is collected and reported in different ways by different countries, and almost certainly undercounts the number of cases and deaths. But organizations and journalists still need to report the available data to inform the public and help guide policymakers. Much of that data ends up in visualizations, like charts and maps, which can make it easier to understand and analyze. But it's important to know how the process of data visualization can shape our perception of the crisis. In this video, we deconstruct one particularly popular chart of covid-19 cases around the world which uses a logarithmic scale, and explain how to avoid being misled by it. Sources: ourworldindata.org/coronavirus#all-charts-preview 91-divoc.com/pages/covid-visualization/ twitter.com/jburnmurdoch medium.com/@mettlinger/a-different-covid-19-graph-updated-and-revised-40f04b90c4e3 www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2020/3/13/21178289/confirmed-coronavirus-cases-us-countries-italy-iran-singapore-hong-kong coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html Read more about the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic at vox.com/coronavirus How social distancing and “flattening the curve” works: bit.ly/3aOlHM8 12 things everyone needs to know about the coronavirus pandemic: bit.ly/2xYrW2x The differences in countries’ coronavirus death rates, explained: bit.ly/3bLGMaV How has the coronavirus pandemic impacted your life? Share to help Vox’s reporting: bit.ly/2vBunqA Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What face masks actually do against coronavirus
What face masks actually do against coronavirus
6 måneder siden
Face masks don't make you invincible. Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution: vox.com/contribute The fight against coronavirus is global. But the guidelines on whether you should wear a face mask as part of that fight are often completely different from place to place. That means that, for a lot of people, whether you wear a face mask when you leave the house is basically up to you. Here’s where almost every expert agrees: If you have Covid-19, and you leave the house, you should wear a mask. Masks help keep sick people from spreading their germs. Most of the uncertainty around mask use is related to a totally separate question: Whether masks can protect healthy people from getting Covid-19. The truth is that no mask can actually guarantee that you won’t get sick; experts say one of the most dangerous assumptions about face masks is that they basically make you invincible. Masks have to be used correctly to offer any protection at all, and they’re most effective if used alongside other preventative measures like hand-washing and social distancing. But experts also say that the question of whether healthy people should wear masks is a lot easier to answer when you consider one of Covid-19’s most dangerous characteristics: Because of the disease’s long incubation period, and the high occurrence of infected people who never feel symptoms at all, it’s almost impossible to be completely sure that you don’t already have it. And that means the safest course of action is ultimately for everyone to behave like a sick person; in other words, to wear a mask. More of Vox.com's coverage of face masks: www.vox.com/2020/3/31/21198132/coronavirus-covid-face-masks-n95-respirator-ppe-shortage An in-depth explainer on viral respiratory particle behavior and covid-19 transmission: medium.com/@Cancerwarrior/covid-19-why-we-should-all-wear-masks-there-is-new-scientific-rationale-280e08ceee71 The US Center for Disease Control's current guidance on face masks: www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-covid-spreads.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fprepare%2Ftransmission.html An MIT disease transmission researcher's study on respiratory droplets and aerosols: jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2763852 Ed Yong's great explainer on the confusion around face masks: www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/04/coronavirus-pandemic-airborne-go-outside-masks/609235/ For the full Schlieren mirror video from Bauhaus University, Weimar: vimeo.com/399120258 The World Health Organization's updated recommendations on face mask use: www.who.int/publications-detail/advice-on-the-use-of-masks-in-the-community-during-home-care-and-in-healthcare-settings-in-the-context-of-the-novel-coronavirus-(2019-ncov)-outbreak Our source for pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic cases: www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2020/new-study-on-COVID-19-estimates-5-days-for-incubation-period.html The headline on this piece has been updated. Previous headline: Why you should wear a face mask to fight coronavirus Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The right way to play Monopoly
The right way to play Monopoly
6 måneder siden
How do you win Monopoly? And how do you keep it fun at the same time? Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Is there a right way to play Monopoly? Brian Valentine takes a stab at the answer - he was the United States representative to the 2015 World Monopoly championships, where he earned a third-place finish. As the above video shows, playing Monopoly right involves learning the rules all over again, processing key strategies, and, above all, valuing the people you play it with. Valentine shares his knowledge about probability heat maps that show the likelihood of landing on a certain space, nuances of gameplay around houses and hotels, and even a few tips on making games fun instead of rancorous. Further reading There are tons of articles that break down the math of Monopoly. While it’s not the only ingredient to playing Monopoly right, it’s an important one. This Business Insider article by Walt Hickey is a great primer, and this Thrillist article by Daisy Barringer gives you even more tips. www.businessinsider.com/math-monopoly-statistics-2013-6 www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/how-to-win-at-monopoly-every-time-according-to-experts If you really want to go deep on Monopoly championships, check out the Fandom history, including Valentine’s appearance in 2015. monopoly-championship-history.fandom.com/wiki/MONOPOLY_Championship_History_Wiki Most top Monopoly players follow in the footsteps of Philip Orbanes, who’s written a few Monopoly books, including this guide. His general board game history book, The Game Makers, is a fun read (but not really about gameplay strategy). books.google.com/books/about/The_Monopoly_Companion.html?id=x42RxZP8VyMC books.google.com/books/about/The_Game_Makers.html?id=pxPgwAEACAAJ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why kids write letters backward
Why kids write letters backward
6 måneder siden
Almost all kids will mirror write at some point. Why? *Our in-studio shoot with other Vox team members was done before the Covid-19 outbreak. We are currently safely working from home.* Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab If you work with (or have) kids under 7, you might notice that a handful of them flip letters, or sometimes entire words, when writing. It’s a little creepy to look at - and reminiscent of Danny from The Shining - but it’s entirely normal. Our minds are exceptionally good at saving space when necessary. Sitting in a classroom, you probably won’t notice the consistent buzz of a heater unless you focus on it. Our eyes do something similar when it comes to orientation. This is because in the natural world, the direction something is facing doesn't really matter all that much. This allows us to identify and recognize objects quickly. It's a truly efficient way to think. Except, when it comes to letters and numbers, where orientation *does* matter. In many ways, the written word is a completely unnatural system for our minds. The reverse of "b" turns it into a "d." Why is 3 left-facing when 5 and 6 are right-facing? It’s confusing because our minds don’t pay too much attention to orientation, and to get the alphabetic system right - we need to. If you're interested in learning more, check out these links: thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-25/edition-10/mirror-writing www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1357650X.2018.1445748 DaVinci was also famously known for mirror writing: www.mos.org/leonardo/activities/mirror-writing Ancient languages can show how humans initially tried other methods that might have made more sense. For example, the ancient language of boustrophedon altered the direction of the letters and script every line - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boustrophedon Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
What the coronavirus looks like up close
What the coronavirus looks like up close
6 måneder siden
Seeing the virus up close helps us understand it. Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution: vox.com/contribute The images of SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that first appeared in humans in late 2019, were made using electron microscopy. The virus measures around 100 nanometers, and the smallest wavelengths of light that humans can see measure around 400 nanometers, meaning the virus is too small to see with a standard light microscope. To see something that small, you need a device that uses smaller wavelengths than light. Electrons, when accelerated in a field, behave as a wave with a tiny wavelength to accomplish this. Two electron microscopy techniques, SEM and TEM, offer different views. A Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) scans the surface of a sample and records information that bounces back, similar to a satellite image. A Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) transmits electrons through a sample and projects a cross section of its inner structure. Together, these images help scientists observe the virus and how it moves in and out of host cells. Check out Vox's guide to navigating the coronavirus: www.vox.com/2020/3/5/21162138/vox-guide-to-covid-19-coronavirus Read and see more about how the virus attacks our bodies in this New Yorker article: www.newyorker.com/science/elements/from-bats-to-human-lungs-the-evolution-of-a-coronavirus Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How images of coronavirus are made Correction: At 4:07, an animation in a previous version of this video implied that antibodies coat the entire cell membrane, when they actually bind to specific proteins on the virus. The error has been corrected.. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The big lesson from South Korea's coronavirus response
The big lesson from South Korea's coronavirus response
6 måneder siden
Testing and tracing were the key to slowing the spread of coronavirus. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In South Korea, citizens have flattened the curve of the novel coronavirus -- and it's because of lessons they learned from fighting the MERS outbreak in 2015. Through a combination of aggressive and widespread testing measures, along with a system know as “contact tracing,” they’ve been better positioned to spot the path of the virus and curb its spread. While they are still vigilant for a second wave of Covid-19 cases, people in South Korea are slowly returning to public life. Watch the video above to find out how their testing and contact tracing measures work, and how it can be a lesson for countries still in lockdown. You can learn more about the 205 MERS outbreak in South Korea and the lessons learned from it here: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840604/ wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/6/16-0120_article www.who.int/emergencies/mers-cov/mers-summary-2016.pdf If you are interested in the first reported cases in Wuhan, China you can check out their public announcement here: wjw.wuhan.gov.cn/front/web/showDetail/2019123108989 This Reuters Graphics piece has a great timeline and visualization of the coronavirus clusters in South Korea: graphics.reuters.com/CHINA-HEALTH-SOUTHKOREA-CLUSTERS/0100B5G33SB/index.html You can read South Korea’s Infectious Disease Control and Prevention Act to learn more about the tools the government has at its disposal to request location information during outbreaks here: www.law.go.kr/LSW/lsInfoP.do?lsiSeq=188080&chrClsCd=010203&urlMode=engLsInfoR&viewCls=engLsInfoR#0000 To learn more about Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong’s handling of the coronavirus check out this TIME article: time.com/5802293/coronavirus-covid19-singapore-hong-kong-taiwan/ You can check out all of our coronavirus videos via this playlist: noburn.info/put/PLJ8cMiYb3G5dBbOh_8kPN5s5aJHt1UCwn And finally, for all things coronavirus, head over to our Coronavirus, Explained hub where we have all of our extensive coronavirus coverage: www.vox.com/coronavirus-covid19 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why NASA quarantined the Apollo 11 astronauts
Why NASA quarantined the Apollo 11 astronauts
6 måneder siden
On July 21, 1969, the Apollo 11 quarantine began. Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution here: vox.com/contribute In this episode of History Club, Vox's Phil Edwards and Coleman Lowndes chat with Amy Shira Teitel of The Vintage Space about the Apollo 11 quarantine. Thanks Amy - check out her channel here: noburn.info/post/w95T_TgbGHhTml4xZ9yIqg.html In History Club, Vox's Phil Edwards and Coleman Lowndes share their discoveries about history both weird and wonderful. Check out the full playlist here. noburn.info/put/PLJ8cMiYb3G5c3rxeWn3e09JkcZlUx7-UU&advanced_settings=1&disable_polymer=1 It was an unusual process for an unprecedented task: keeping potential moon germs from entering the Earth’s atmosphere (and affecting its population). To try to isolate the Apollo astronauts from the Earth, NASA went to extraordinary lengths. They clothed them in “Biological Isolation Garments,” transported them on a converted Airstream trailer, and then quarantined them for weeks in a Lunar Receiving Lab specially built to analyze moon samples and, of course, the men who went there. The quarantine was a strange capstone to the journey to the moon - but also a necessary one that’s surprisingly resonant today. Further reading NASA has an excellent flight journal chronicling the quarantine. history.nasa.gov/afj/lrl/apollo-quarantine.html The National Archives has a treasure trove of Apollo 11 footage. Searching it can be a bit clunky, but the results are astonishing and helped make this video. You can start a search for the Mobile Quarantine Facility (abbreviated as MQF) here. catalog.archives.gov/search?q=mqf&f.materialsType=movingimages NASA also has multiple oral histories that relate to the quarantine. This one with John Hirasaki is a good starting point. historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/oral_histories/HirasakiJK/HirasakiJK_3-6-09.htm We were joined in this conversation by Amy Shira Teitel, whose NOburn channel The Vintage Space chronicles a range of topics related to space and the middle of the 20th century. noburn.info/post/w95T_TgbGHhTml4xZ9yIqg.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The 8-bit arcade font, deconstructed
The 8-bit arcade font, deconstructed
6 måneder siden
In his book Arcade Game Typography, type designer Toshi Omagari breaks down the evolution, design, and history of arcade game fonts. Thanks to our sponsor, Ting Mobile. Visit vox.ting.com/ for a $25 service credit with no contracts and no commitments. In the video above, he guides us through this delightful 8-bit world and breaks it down pixel by pixel. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Let's talk about sources! Archive.org has a wonderful collection of vintage arcade games that you can play online. This is where many of the videos of arcade games came from. archive.org/details/internetarcade In addition to that, Barcade allowed us to film their collection of arcades. barcadenewyork.com/ Toshi's book served as a blueprint for all the fonts you see in the video. You can purchase it here: thamesandhudson.com/arcade-game-typography-9780500021743 Finally, a few great places on the internet I discovered while researching the video: This arcade font writer created by @photonstorm arcade.photonstorm.com/ Archive.org's magazine and manuals collection: archive.org/details/arcademanuals archive.org/details/gamemagazines This list of websites compiled by Atarimania: www.atarimania.com/list-atari-links.html By Design is a Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology. Watch all episodes in this series right here on NOburn: noburn.info/put/PLJ8cMiYb3G5eD0M1Bfm6lvHy5BR6hoY8X Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why coronavirus scammers can send fake emails from the WHO
Why coronavirus scammers can send fake emails from the WHO
6 måneder siden
Organizations could prevent domain spoofing, but many don't. Join the Open Sourced Reporting Network: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork Read more here: www.vox.com/recode/2020/4/2/21202852/coronavirus-scam-email-who-spoofing-domain-dmarc During the coronavirus pandemic, scammers have sent several emails using the domain of the World Health Organization. Some are addressed from Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of the WHO, and carry attachments that can install malware on the victim’s device. Others announce a coronavirus cure that you can read all about in an attachment. They each appear to be sent from the WHO's who.int email address. If it seems like it shouldn’t be this easy to impersonate a leading global health institution, you’re right. There is a way for organizations and companies to prevent spoofing of their domain using a free authentication system called DMARC, but the WHO, like many other companies and organizations, hasn’t done it. Sources: DHS Binding Directive: cyber.dhs.gov/bod/18-01/ DMARC status of industries: www.valimail.com/resources/domain-spoofing-declines-as-protective-measures-grow/ What is DMARC: www.valimail.com/dmarc-monitor/what-is-dmarc/ "Towards Understanding the Adoption of Anti-Spoofing Protocols in Email Systems" people.cs.vt.edu/gangwang/survey.pdf "End-to-End Measurements of Email Spoofing Attacks" www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/usenixsecurity18/sec18-hu.pdf "Coronavirus-related Lures Comprise More Than 80 Percent of the Threat Landscape" www.proofpoint.com/us/threat-insight/post/threat-snapshot-coronavirus-related-lures-comprise-more-80-percent-threat "Covid-19 Drug Advice From the WHO Spoofed to Distribute Agent Tesla Info-Stealer" exchange.xforce.ibmcloud.com/collection/Covid-19-Drug-Advice-From-The-WHO-Disguised-As-HawkEye-Info-Stealer-2f9a23ad901ad94a8668731932ab5826 Open Sourced is a year-long reporting project from Recode by Vox that goes deep into the closed ecosystems of data, privacy, algorithms, and artificial intelligence. Learn more at www.vox.com/opensourced Join the Open Sourced Reporting Network: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork This project is made possible by the Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists. Watch all episodes of Open Sourced right here on NOburn: bit.ly/2tIHftD Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Coronavirus is not the flu. It's worse.
Coronavirus is not the flu. It's worse.
7 måneder siden
Send this to anyone who still thinks Covid-19 is basically the same as the flu. Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution here: vox.com/contribute Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has similar symptoms to the flu. They also spread in similar ways. So it's natural to want to compare the two. But Covid-19 is very different, in ways that make it much more dangerous. And understanding how is key to understanding why we have to take it so seriously. Read more on Vox: How social distancing and “flattening the curve” works: bit.ly/3aOlHM8 The math behind social distancing: bit.ly/3a78wG8 The rules of social distancing: bit.ly/2xDoZnb How does the coronavirus outbreak end? Your biggest questions answered: bit.ly/39YzlfG How has the coronavirus pandemic impacted your life? Share to help Vox’s reporting: bit.ly/2vBunqA Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Being our best selves during coronavirus
Being our best selves during coronavirus
7 måneder siden
The virtual solidarity we all need right now. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The spread of coronavirus has affected people all around the world. Many are locked in their homes, countless businesses are shut down, and life as many knew it has come to a halt. But amid the crisis and the uncertainty, acts of kindness and solidarity have spread. Take a look at the many expressions of joy, teamwork, and support that have emerged from different corners of the world. They're a reminder that while many of us are isolated in our homes or on the frontlines of the fight against this virus, we are all in this together. Read more on Vox: vox.com/coronavirus How social distancing and “flattening the curve” works: bit.ly/3aOlHM8 The math behind social distancing: bit.ly/3a78wG8 The rules of social distancing: bit.ly/2xDoZnb How does the coronavirus outbreak end? Your biggest questions answered: bit.ly/39YzlfG How has the coronavirus pandemic impacted your life? Share to help Vox’s reporting: bit.ly/2vBunqA Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why paid sick leave is essential to beating coronavirus
Why paid sick leave is essential to beating coronavirus
7 måneder siden
Paid sick leave keeps everyone healthier. During a pandemic, it's a necessity. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In most developed countries, workers have the right to a certain number of paid sick days. It’s a policy that isn’t rooted in just generosity - during pandemics like the novel coronavirus, it can literally save lives. When workers have to choose between earning a living and staying home sick, it incentivizes them to come to work when they're ill, and potentially infect their colleagues and anyone else they come into contact with. That’s why public health officials are concerned that millions of American workers don’t have access to paid sick days. And a disproportionate share of those workers are concentrated in occupations like food service and hospitality, where there’s potential to infect the hundreds of customers many of them interact with every day. Correction: At 1:18, islands in Canada, Denmark, Japan, Italy, and Australia are missing highlights. Previous headline: One policy that changes the coronavirus math Further reading: The Italian Ministry of Health www.thelocal.it/20200309/map-which-parts-of-italy-are-affected-by-coronavirus-outbreak World Health Organization en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019%E2%80%9320_coronavirus_pandemic#/media/File:2020_coronavirus_cases_outside_China.svg Center for Economic and Policy Research media.milanote.com/p/files/1Jcvmg1vhFTY82/Rt8/CEPR%20-%20paid%20sick%20leave%20in%2022%20countries%20%282020%20update%29.pdf Pew Research Center www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/03/12/as-coronavirus-spreads-which-u-s-workers-have-paid-sick-leave-and-which-dont/ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html A Better Balance www.abetterbalance.org/resources/map-of-paid-sick-time-laws/ Milwaukee Journal Sentinel archive.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/33874059.html Wisconsin State Legislature docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/2011/proposals/sb23 PR Watch www.prwatch.org/files/ALEC%20Labor%20Business%20Reg%20Subcttee%20Annual%20Mtg%202011.pdf#8 Economic Policy Institute www.epi.org/preemption-map/ House Democrats (via CNN) www.cnn.com/2020/03/12/politics/coronavirus-house-economic-bill/index.html US House of Representatives docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/20200309/BILLS-116hr6201-SUS.pdf The New York Times www.nytimes.com/2020/03/14/opinion/sunday/coronavirus-paid-sick-leave.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Social distancing during coronavirus, explained by an expert
Social distancing during coronavirus, explained by an expert
7 måneder siden
To fight coronavirus, we need to change how we live. Read more about the coronavirus pandemic at vox.com/coronavirus “Social distancing,” also called physical distancing, is the best way to slow the spread of coronavirus and save lives in your community. It means leaving home as little as possible, keeping six feet away from others in public, and generally just limiting in-person social contact. But the rules of social distancing can be sort of blurry and confusing. Can you have close friends over for dinner? Can you visit relatives? Can you get on a plane if you’re wearing a face mask? What is life even supposed to look like without social contact? We spoke with University of Pennsylvania social epidemiologist Carolyn Cannuscio about how we should think about social distancing, and what measures we should each be taking to do our part in slowing down the pandemic. Practicing social distancing properly isn’t easy, she says. But it’s also the best thing that each of us can do right now in the service of public health. Note: The headline on this piece has been updated. Previous headline: How to social distance, according to an expert Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How soap kills the coronavirus
How soap kills the coronavirus
7 måneder siden
Plain old soap and water absolutely annihilate coronavirus. Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution here: vox.com/contribute You've been told a thousand times: wash your hands to stop the spread of COVID-19. But why does this work so well? It has to do with the way the soap molecules are able to absolutely demolish viruses, like the coronavirus. Read more on Vox: How does hand sanitizer compare to soap: bit.ly/2WqzEfo Songs to wash your hands by: bit.ly/2Uj3T5g How social distancing and “flattening the curve” works: bit.ly/3aOlHM8 How does the coronavirus outbreak end? Your biggest questions answered: bit.ly/39YzlfG How has the coronavirus pandemic impacted your life? Share to help Vox’s reporting: bit.ly/2vBunqA Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO
Why fighting the coronavirus depends on you
Why fighting the coronavirus depends on you
7 måneder siden
If we can slow the virus down, it could save hundreds of thousands of lives. Read more about the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic at vox.com/coronavirus In March 2020, the World Health Organization officially classified Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, as a pandemic. That means the disease no longer constitutes just an outbreak or even an epidemic; the coronavirus has now spread around the world, and will continue to reach into other countries and communities. That’s in part because of how contagious the virus is. When you’re infected with the flu, it takes about two days before you start to show symptoms. But coronavirus symptoms take an average of five to six days to appear, so it’s easy to spread well before you notice that you’re feeling sick. Many people are spreading it while going about their daily lives as usual. The risk is that once coronavirus starts to spread in a community, about 20% of cases are severe and may require hospitalization. As those cases multiply, hospitals can fill up quickly. And people with severe cases of COVID-19 who can’t receive proper medical attention are at a much higher risk of dying. Ideally, we would be able to stop the virus from spreading entirely. We can’t do that right now. What we can do is slow it down, so that the severe cases get spread out over a longer period of time, and hospitals are less likely to be overwhelmed on any given day. And that’s where each one of us comes in. The best way to slow down the spread is for everyone - healthy, sick, young, old - to limit social contact as much as possible, immediately. This is called social distancing, and it only works if enough of us do it. But if we do, it could mean the difference between the life and death of someone you know. Read more on Vox: How social distancing and “flattening the curve” works: bit.ly/3aOlHM8 The math behind social distancing: bit.ly/3a78wG8 The rules of social distancing: bit.ly/2xDoZnb How does the coronavirus outbreak end? Your biggest questions answered: bit.ly/39YzlfG How has the coronavirus pandemic impacted your life? Share to help Vox’s reporting: bit.ly/2vBunqA Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution here: vox.com/contribute Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H NOTE: We've made community translated captions available for this video in 60+ languages. Submit or edit translations using this link: noburn.info_video?v=dSQztKXR6k0&ref=share If you see any errors in the translations we've made public, let us know at [email protected]
Delhi’s deadly riots, explained by an expert
Delhi’s deadly riots, explained by an expert
7 måneder siden
The new law that's testing India’s secular values. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO On December 11th, 2019, India’s parliament passed a controversial new law: the Citizenship Amendment Act. The law fast-tracks citizenship for migrants from three neighboring countries, specifically if they are Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Parsis, or Christians. It conspicuously leaves out Muslims. Since the law was passed, it’s drawn widespread opposition and protests, and not only because it discriminates against Muslims. The law is also closely linked to another controversial initiative: the National Registry of Citizens, a citizenship list that could potentially leave millions of people, primarily Muslims, stateless. So far, only the northeastern state of Assam has implemented the NRC. In August 2019, the government of Assam published a citizenship list that left off nearly 2 million residents. And without the citizenship fast-track that the Citizenship Amendment Act grants to other religions, the Muslims left off that list are at risk of losing their citizenship entirely. To understand the law, the national registry of citizens, the controversy they’ve ignited, and what might happen next, we spoke with Milan Vaishnav, Director of the South Asia Program at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. For more context on India’s secular roots and its tense religious divide, watch our episode of Vox Borders India about the 1947 partition of India: noburn.info/id/video/2GmzpJWFipB5hWk.html And for more recent context, you can watch another Vox Borders video about India’s cow vigilantes and their attacks on Muslims in recent years: noburn.info/id/video/2H3Cet1idqeLpWU.html If you want to dive deep into the law, here’s both India’s original 1955 Citizenship Act and the 2019 Citizenship Amendment Act, which modifies the original law to provide a new path to citizenship based on religion: legislative.gov.in/actsofparliamentfromtheyear/citizenship-act-1955 egazette.nic.in/WriteReadData/2019/214646.pdf You can also learn more about how documentation (birth certificates in particular) works in India and why millions are vulnerable to the new law: www.indiaspend.com/birth-certificates-are-citizenship-proof-govt-says-but-38-under-5-children-dont-have-one/ And watch France 24’s news coverage of the situation in Assam, including the detention camps: noburn.info/id/video/3arMi890oaJrgKQ.html The step-by-step fact-checking process of the verified viral videos of the mosque being vandalized in Delhi can be found here: www.altnews.in/verification-video-of-mosque-vandalised-set-on-fire-is-from-ashok-nagar-in-delhi/ And here, for the police brutality video: www.altnews.in/video-verification-delhi-cops-beating-injured-men-forcing-them-to-sing-national-anthem/ Here are some additional sources on the rise of Hindu nationalism in India under Modi’s BJP party: carnegieendowment.org/2019/04/04/religious-nationalism-and-india-s-future-pub-78703 www.reuters.com/article/us-india-religion-temple-factbox/factbox-what-does-indias-ruling-hindu-nationalist-party-want-to-achieve-idUSKBN1XL1PS www.hrw.org/world-report/2019/country-chapters/india And finally, you can also read our latest articles covering the most notable developments of the unrest sparked by the Citizenship Amendment Act: www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/9/17/20861427/india-assam-citizenship-muslim-detention-camps www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/12/12/21010975/india-muslim-citizenship-bill-national-register www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/12/16/21024306/india-protests-muslim-citizenship-amendment-bill www.vox.com/world/2019/12/21/21033083/india-muslim-protests-citizenship-amendment-bill-cab-caa Thanks for watching! And make sure to let us know what you think of this video in the comments! Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How San Francisco erased a neighborhood
How San Francisco erased a neighborhood
7 måneder siden
A hotel at the heart of San Francisco’s housing wars Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab With an explosion of tech companies and startups in recent decades, San Francisco has struggled with a massive affordable housing crisis. But the beginnings of that crisis go back much further than Silicon Valley. In 1968, a group of predominantly Filipino elders in San Francisco launched a battle to protect their home from eviction. Called the International Hotel, their home ended up in the crossroads of a city prioritizing the “Manhattanization” of its downtown area. Their fight for their neighborhood would evolve into a nearly decade-long protest with thousands of supporters and become a symbol of the campaign for affordable housing for decades to come. In the Vox series Missing Chapter, Vox Senior Producer Ranjani Chakraborty revisits underreported and often overlooked moments from the past to give context to the present. Join her as she covers the histories that are often left out of our textbooks. Have an idea for a story that Ranjani should investigate for Missing Chapter? Send it to her via this form! bit.ly/2RhjxMy Sign up for the Missing Chapter newsletter to stay up to date with the series: vox.com/missing-chapter Explore the full Missing Chapter playlist, including episodes, a creator Q&A, and more! noburn.info/put/PLJ8cMiYb3G5fR2kt0L4Nihvel4pEDw9od One of our biggest archival footage sources for this story was Curtis Choy’s documentary, “The Fall of the I-Hotel.” To watch his full documentary, check out: vimeo.com/ondemand/thefalloftheihotel For more on this history, read Estella Habal’s book, “San Francisco’s International Hotel”: tupress.temple.edu/book/0489 Find out more about Manilatown at the Manilatown Heritage Foundation: manilatown.org/ Read past coverage of the history of the International Hotel at the San Francisco Chronicle: projects.sfchronicle.com/2017/international-hotel/ Note: The headline on this piece has been updated. Previous headline: The violent eviction that transformed San Francisco Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How wildlife trade is linked to coronavirus
How wildlife trade is linked to coronavirus
7 måneder siden
And why the disease first appeared in China. NOTE: As our expert Peter Li points out in the video, “The majority of the people in China do not eat wildlife animals. Those people who consume these wildlife animals are the rich and the powerful -a small minority.” This video explains how the people of China are themselves victims of the conditions that led to coronavirus. The virus is affecting many different countries and cultures, and there is never justification for xenophobia or racism. You can find further reading on this on Vox: www.vox.com/2020/2/7/21126758/coronavirus-xenophobia-racism-china-asians www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2020/3/4/21157825/coronavirus-pandemic-xenophobia-racism www.vox.com/identities/2020/3/6/21166625/coronavirus-photos-racism As of early March 2020, a new coronavirus, called COVID-19, is in more than 70 countries and has killed more than 3,100 people, the vast majority in China. That's where the virus emerged back in December 2019. This isn't a new phenomenon for China; in 2003, the SARS virus also emerged there, and under similar circumstances, before spreading around the world and killing nearly 800. Both SARS and COVID-19 are in the "coronavirus" family, and both appear to have emerged from animals in China's notorious wildlife markets. Experts had long predicted that these markets, known to be potential sources of disease, would enable another outbreak. The markets, and the wildlife trade that supports them, are the underlying problem of these pandemics; until China solves that problem, more are likely to emerge. Follow our reporting on coronavirus on vox.com: Our updated guide to Covid-19: bit.ly/3cGvqpU 11 questions about the coronavirus outbreak, answered: bit.ly/3cHFSgT Why washing your hands is so important: bit.ly/39vOaGy Watch our Netflix episode "The next pandemic, explained" www.netflix.com/watch/81062202 Further reading: Peter Li: www.scmp.com/comment/opinion/article/3047828/first-sars-now-wuhan-coronavirus-heres-why-china-should-ban-its Peter Daszak, EcoAlliance: www.nytimes.com/2020/01/28/science/bats-coronavirus-Wuhan.html WildAid: wildaid.org/chinese-citizens-call-for-permanent-ban-on-wildlife-markets/ On the animal source: www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00548-w?fbclid=IwAR1TaU8leMGzeMUzV0uZVIOBskJC2Zh4P7hixJfBEvwnsouHZGZnF4QTz_A Support Vox by joining the Video Lab at vox.com/join or making a one-time contribution here: vox.com/contribute Note: The headline has been updated. Previous headline: Why new diseases keep appearing in China Note: A previous version of this video incorrectly colored Crimea as part of Russia on the map. While it has been occupied by Russian forces since 2014, it is still legally a territory of Ukraine. We've corrected the error. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Subscribe to our channel and don't forget to turn on notifications: goo.gl/0bsAjO Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Computers just got a lot better at writing
Computers just got a lot better at writing
7 måneder siden
How machines can mimic our language. Join the Open Sourced Reporting Network: www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork Something big happened in the past year: Researchers created computer programs that can write long passages of coherent, original text. Language models like GPT-2, Grover, and CTRL create text passages that seem written by someone fluent in the language, but not in the truth. That AI field, Natural Language Processing (NLP), didn’t exactly set out to create a fake news machine. Rather, it’s the byproduct of a line of research into massive pretrained language models: Machine learning programs that store vast statistical maps of how we use our language. So far, the technology’s creative uses seem to outnumber its malicious ones. But it’s not difficult to imagine how these text-fakes could cause harm, especially as these models become widely shared and deployable by anyone with basic know-how. Read more here: www.vox.com/recode/2020/3/4/21163743/ai-language-generation-fake-text-gpt2 Open Sourced is a year-long reporting project from Recode by Vox that goes deep into the closed ecosystems of data, privacy, algorithms, and artificial intelligence. Learn more at www.vox.com/opensourced This project is made possible by the Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists. Watch all episodes of Open Sourced right here on NOburn: bit.ly/2tIHftD Try out natural language generation and detection with these tools: demo.allennlp.org/next-token-lm talktotransformer.com/ transformer.huggingface.co/ grover.allenai.org/ www.ai21.com/haim gltr.io/ play.aidungeon.io/ huggingface.co/openai-detector/ Sources: ruder.io/nlp-imagenet/ medium.com/@ageitgey/deepfaking-the-news-with-nlp-and-transformer-models-5e057ebd697d openai.com/blog/better-language-models/ blog.einstein.ai/introducing-a-conditional-transformer-language-model-for-controllable-generation/ veredshwartz.blogspot.com/2019/08/text-generation.html www.mattkenney.me/gpt-2-345/ www.mattkenney.me/gpt-2/ jalammar.github.io/illustrated-gpt2/ mc.ai/introduction-to-language-modelling-and-deep-neural-network-based-text-generation/ fortune.com/2020/01/20/natural-language-processing-business/ www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/2/14/18222270/artificial-intelligence-open-ai-natural-language-processing www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/14/can-a-machine-learn-to-write-for-the-new-yorker noburn.info/id/video/rXnXk6hnoKmMi3Y.html arxiv.org/pdf/1905.12616.pdf arxiv.org/abs/1911.03343 arxiv.org/abs/1904.09751 techscience.org/a/2019121801/ www.middlebury.edu/institute/sites/www.middlebury.edu.institute/files/2019-11/The%20Industrialization%20of%20Terrorist%20Propaganda%20-%20CTEC.pdf?fv=TzdJnlDw newsyoucantuse.com/ aiweirdness.com/post/168051907512/the-first-line-of-a-novel-by-an-improved-neural aiweirdness.com/post/159302925452/the-neural-network-generated-pickup-lines-that-are www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/10/26/opinion/halloween-spooky-costumes-machine-learning-generator.html aiweirdness.com/post/160985569682/paint-colors-designed-by-neural-network-part-2 www.reddit.com/r/SubSimulatorGPT2/ twitter.com/dril_gpt2 cloud.google.com/text-to-speech/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
The case for Elizabeth Warren
The case for Elizabeth Warren
8 måneder siden
To fix the country's problems, you have to understand them. Up next: The case for Bernie Sanders: bit.ly/2wdX38E This video is one of a series in which Vox writers argue the cases for the leading Democratic candidates in the 2020 election. (Vox does not endorse individual candidates.) The case for Bernie Sanders: noburn.info/id/video/l4TNf9BzhmWXqmk.html The case for Joe Biden: noburn.info/id/video/mpeYl9mAgHudkKg.html The case for Elizabeth Warren: noburn.info/id/video/vHbTnr11fH17fWk.html The case for Pete Buttigieg: noburn.info/id/video/lq23aMyhdm5ta5w.html And you can read our cases for all the candidates, including Mike Bloomberg and Amy Klobuchar, at vox.com/the-case-for Update: Elizabeth Warren withdrew her candidacy on March 5, 2020: www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2020/3/5/21120368/elizabeth-warren-drops-out-2020-race-bernie-sanders-women Elizabeth Warren is 70, but she’s a relative newcomer to politics. Before she became a US senator in 2012, she was a law professor. And in the early 2000s, she was driven by one question: Why, at a time when the economy seemed so good, were so many American families declaring bankruptcy? The answers she found turned her into one of the country’s fiercest advocates for consumers. They helped change how we think about the economy itself. And, Vox’s Ezra Klein argues, it’s Warren’s understanding of America’s big, systemic problems that makes her uniquely qualified to be the next president. So: What exactly is it that Elizabeth Warren understands? What kind of president would she be? And what does any of that tell us about how she would fare in a general election against Donald Trump? Read more about the case for Warren on Vox.com: bit.ly/2SgH2Xb Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The case for Joe Biden
The case for Joe Biden
8 måneder siden
It comes down to where the people who love him are. Up next: The case for Bernie Sanders: bit.ly/2wdX38E This video is one of a series in which Vox writers argue the cases for the leading Democratic candidates in the 2020 election. (Vox does not endorse individual candidates.) The case for Bernie Sanders: noburn.info/id/video/l4TNf9BzhmWXqmk.html The case for Joe Biden: noburn.info/id/video/mpeYl9mAgHudkKg.html The case for Elizabeth Warren: noburn.info/id/video/vHbTnr11fH17fWk.html The case for Pete Buttigieg: noburn.info/id/video/lq23aMyhdm5ta5w.html And you can read our cases for all the candidates, including Mike Bloomberg and Amy Klobuchar, at vox.com/the-case-for Former Vice President Joe Biden has been a familiar face in American politics for decades. And he’s built his long career on personal relationships - relationships with fellow Democrats, but also with Republicans. More than any other candidate in this race, Biden’s campaign is defined by his belief that consensus among the parties isn’t only possible. It’s preferable. It’s an outlook shaped by Biden’s past experiences, and in an election defined by competing visions of the future, Biden’s nostalgic style stands out. But Vox’s Laura McGann argues that the case for Biden is all about where, and with whom, that moderate, nostalgic message will resonate. Because if you look to the election that won Democrats the House of Representatives in 2018, the message that drove that victory looks a lot like Biden’s. So: What is that message exactly? What are Joe Biden's politics? And why are so many people convinced he can beat Donald Trump? Read more about the case for Biden on Vox.com: bit.ly/2UsHcxc Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The case for Pete Buttigieg
The case for Pete Buttigieg
8 måneder siden
What’s the case for a President Mayor Pete? Up next: The case for Bernie Sanders: bit.ly/2wdX38E This video is one of a series in which Vox writers argue the cases for the leading Democratic candidates in the 2020 election. (Vox does not endorse individual candidates.) The case for Bernie Sanders: noburn.info/id/video/l4TNf9BzhmWXqmk.html The case for Joe Biden: noburn.info/id/video/mpeYl9mAgHudkKg.html The case for Elizabeth Warren: noburn.info/id/video/vHbTnr11fH17fWk.html The case for Pete Buttigieg: noburn.info/id/video/lq23aMyhdm5ta5w.html And you can read our cases for all the candidates, including Mike Bloomberg and Amy Klobuchar, at vox.com/the-case-for Update: Pete Buttigieg withdrew his candidacy on March 1, 2020: www.vox.com/2020/3/1/21121523/pete-buttigieg-drops-out-2020-presidential-election If he won the 2020 election, former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg would become the youngest US president ever. And at 38 years old, his age puts him in good company with many of the Democrats’ recent successful nominees: Barack Obama, John F. Kennedy, and Bill Clinton. But as Vox’s Dylan Matthews argues, that’s not Mayor Pete’s only similarity with recent Democratic presidents. Like Obama and Clinton before him, Buttigieg has a way of describing traditionally liberal ideas, like expanded access to health care and higher taxes on the wealthy, in a way that appeals to voters who don’t necessarily identify as liberals. So: What kind of president would Pete Buttigieg be? What makes him different from the other candidates in the race? And what would his advantage be in a general election against Donald Trump? Read more about the case for Buttigieg on Vox.com: bit.ly/31qABF3 Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The case for Bernie Sanders
The case for Bernie Sanders
8 måneder siden
To understand Bernie's future, look at what he's already done. Up next: The case for Joe Biden: bit.ly/2TibqRm This video is one of a series in which Vox writers argue the cases for the leading Democratic candidates in the 2020 election. (Vox does not endorse individual candidates.) The case for Bernie Sanders: noburn.info/id/video/l4TNf9BzhmWXqmk.html The case for Joe Biden: noburn.info/id/video/mpeYl9mAgHudkKg.html The case for Elizabeth Warren: noburn.info/id/video/vHbTnr11fH17fWk.html The case for Pete Buttigieg: noburn.info/id/video/lq23aMyhdm5ta5w.html And you can read our cases for all the candidates, including Mike Bloomberg and Amy Klobuchar, at vox.com/the-case-for Bernie Sanders knows what energizes his crowds: Big ideas. Visions of political revolution. New ways of doing things. It’s why his supporters love him. But it’s also why many Democrats are still unsure about him. But as Vox’s Matthew Yglesias argues, a good answer to that uncertainty can be found in Bernie Sanders’s political record; both as mayor of Burlington, Vermont, and as Vermont’s representative to the US House and Senate. Sanders is a lifelong politician. And if you look at what he’s done, there’s a lot to learn about what he would do if he actually became president. So: What does Sanders’s record actually tell us? What kind of president would he be? And what would his advantage be in a general election against Donald Trump? Read more about the case for Bernie on Vox.com: bit.ly/392tIfE And you can watch the archives of Bernie Sanders’s old TV show here: www.cctv.org/watch-tv/series/bernie-speaks-community Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
The conspiracy behind this famous statue
The conspiracy behind this famous statue
8 måneder siden
The Venus de Milo has another missing piece. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO The Venus de Milo is iconic. Why? It turns out a missing piece might have something to do with it. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the secret history of the Venus de Milo, the famous armless statue from Greece. Found in 1820, the Venus de Milo was always considered notable, but it’s a complicated political situation that made the statue iconic. French art and the Louvre were struggling when Venus was discovered. A large cache of art - looted by Napoleon around the world - had recently been returned to various home countries, and that left a huge gap in the Louvre’s classical art collection. Venus was the perfect solution - and the French went to extreme lengths to make sure nobody questioned her legitimacy. The result was a globally famous statue with a complicated and secretive history. Make your own Venus using a 3D printed model: www.myminifactory.com/object/3d-print-venus-aphrodite-is-the-goddess-of-love-she-was-depicted-in-the-nude-or-in-various-stages-of-nudity-and-painted-the-figure-is-executed-in-the-hellenistic-style-and-famed-for-its-sensuous-appearance-it-supposedly-lost-its-arms-in-a-struggle-arising-b-25162 If you want to learn more about Venus, check out: Disarmed by Gregory Curtis Incredibly detailed, this book immerses you in the life and times of one of the world’s most famous statues. www.amazon.com/Disarmed-Story-Venus-Gregory-Curtis/dp/1400031338 The Venus de Milo: Genesis of a Modern Myth by Philippe Jockey This paper provides the best and clearest synopsis of how and why the French concealed the truth about the Venus de Milo. www.academia.edu/12027590/_The_Venus_de_Milo._Genesis_of_a_Modern_Myth_in_Z._Bahrani_Z._Celik_E._Eldem_dir._Scramble_for_the_past._A_story_of_archaeology_in_the_Ottoman_Empire_1753-1914_2011_ Creating the Past: The Vénus de Milo and the Hellenistic Reception of Classical Greece by Rachel Kousser This paper helpfully grounds the Venus in the Hellenistic era (and provides a good summary of her discovery and subsequent theories). www.ajaonline.org/article/100 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
America's presidential primaries, explained
America's presidential primaries, explained
8 måneder siden
Why does America's system for picking the president start in Iowa? Before Americans vote on the next president in November, both major political parties have to settle on a nominee. That process is called the primary, and in 2020 it consists of 64 different contests, held on 22 different days, over several months. And for some reason, it all starts in the midwestern state of Iowa. So how did America's political parties come up with this system? And is there a better way to do it? Read more from Li on the future of Iowa: www.vox.com/2020/2/3/21046546/presidential-primary-state-order-iowa-new-hampshire-south-carolina A previous version of this video misidentified the states of Missouri and Arkansas. The error has been corrected. Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o
How the British royal family makes money
How the British royal family makes money
8 måneder siden
This is what Harry and Meghan are giving up. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The British royal family is very rich, but not as rich as you might think. And that’s because of a centuries-old model for how they make their income - and taboos about earning a private income outside of their official duties. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are breaking free from the rules of how royals make money, which just might be a savvy financial decision. Note: The properties illustrated on our map are only the properties we were able to geo-locate precisely from the following sources. www.thecrownestate.co.uk/en-gb/our-places/asset-map/ www.duchyoflancaster.co.uk/properties-and-estates/holdings/ duchyofcornwall.org/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
This photo triggered China's Cultural Revolution
This photo triggered China's Cultural Revolution
8 måneder siden
Mao Zedong swimming in a river in 1966 was a big deal. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab In 1966, Mao Zedong, China’s communist leader and the founder of the People’s Republic of China, was rumored to be in failing health. The devastating policies of his Great Leap Forward (1958-1962) - which forced millions of peasants to work tirelessly on government farming communes and by manufacturing crude steel - resulted in the greatest famine known to human history, costing anywhere between 23 and 55 million lives. Mao wanted to leave behind a powerful Communist legacy, like Marx and Lenin before him. And in order to do so, he needed to connect with the younger generation before he died. So after announcing his Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, he swam across the Yangtze River. Mao had done the same swim 10 years earlier to prove his vitality, and he hoped it would work again. His "Cultural Revolution" was a call to hunt down and eliminate his enemies, and reeducate China’s youth with the principles Maoism. Led by the fanatical Red Guards, the Cultural Revolution was a devastating 10-year period in Chinese history that didn’t end until Mao died in 1976. Additional reading: Embodying Maoism: The swimming craze, the Mao cult, and body politics in Communist China, 1950s-1970s, by Shuk-wah Poon doi.org/10.1017/S0026749X17000804 Red-Color News Soldier, by Li Zhensheng red-colornewssoldier.com/ Darkroom is a history and photography series that anchors each episode around a single image. Analyzing what the photo shows (or doesn't show) provides context that helps unravel a wider story. Watch previous episodes here: noburn.info/id/video/ypjMgK59pa1qpKA.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How a Bible prophecy shapes Trump's foreign policy
How a Bible prophecy shapes Trump's foreign policy
8 måneder siden
For an influential group of American Christians, support for Israel -- and hatred of Iran -- are based in a biblical prophecy. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab When President Trump authorized the drone strike that killed the powerful Iranian general Qasem Soleimani, he wasn't just flexing America's muscle in the Middle East. He was also acting on the advice of a politically powerful group of evangelical Christians who believe that the US and Israel are part of the Bible's plan to bring about the second coming of Jesus. Once considered a fringe element of the religious right, evangelical Christian Zionists are playing an increasingly visible role in Republican politics. Today, unprecedented access to the Trump administration has given them an opportunity to reshape the Middle East. Additional reading: newrepublic.com/article/156166/pence-pompeo-evanglicals-war-iran-christian-zionism www.washingtonpost.com/news/politics/wp/2018/05/14/half-of-evangelicals-support-israel-because-they-believe-it-is-important-for-fulfilling-end-times-prophecy/ www.vox.com/2018/11/5/18059454/trump-white-evangelicals-christian-nationalism-john-fea A previous version of this video misstated, at 1:40, the percentage of Americans who are Christian but neither Evangelical nor Catholic. The error has been corrected. The headline on this piece has also been updated. Previous headline: How the Bible shapes Trump's foreign policy Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Was this the greatest dog of all time?
Was this the greatest dog of all time?
8 måneder siden
The Westminster Kennel Club Dog show had a champion who won three times in a row. How did she do it? Subscribe to our channel! goo.gl/0bsAjO This year, the Westminster Dog Show will draw lots of attention. But no dog will surpass the legacy of the first Best in Show winner - a smooth fox terrier named Warren Remedy. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox's Phil Edwards explains how it happened. Warren Remedy won three Best in Show titles at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, and she cemented her place in canine history. But her legacy extends beyond her title - as an exemplar of the smooth fox terrier breed, she helped establish the “type” that people expected. That was largely because of her breeder, a wealthy Manhattan socialite named Winthrop Rutherfurd. Rutherfurd famously dated a Vanderbilt before settling down with a vice president’s daughter, but in addition to lighting up the gossip pages, he bred fox terriers at his estate in Allamuchy, New Jersey. And he promoted them through the American Fox Terrier Club and Westminster Kennel Club. These efforts helped the relatively new breed gain a foothold in American culture. Warren Remedy may never be surpassed in her three Best in Show titles. So was she the greatest dog of all time? That might be the wrong question. She was the greatest dog of her time, though, and that may have established an even more important legacy, for all dogs and for the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Further Reading: This archival article from Outing Magazine has a surprising interesting history of smooth terriers in America, including how the breed can be traced to just a few dogs. books.google.com/books?id=qb9DAQAAIAAJ&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&dq=%22warren%20remedy%22&pg=PA349#v=onepage&q&f=false The Dog Show: 125 Years of Westminster is a great resource for dog show obsessives, and it chronicles all the winners as well as the early history and lore of the show. www.amazon.com/Dog-Show-125-Years-Westminster/dp/1592282636 The American Kennel Club lists all their dog standards on their website. The listing for the wire fox terrier is a good place to start. www.akc.org/dog-breeds/wire-fox-terrier/ Previous headline: How this dog won Westminster three times Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
A VFX artist reacts to 5 Oscar-nominated movies
A VFX artist reacts to 5 Oscar-nominated movies
8 måneder siden
The 2020 VFX Oscar nominations, explained by a VFX artist. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab 1917, Avengers: Endgame, The Irishman, The Lion King, and Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker are five very different movies nominated for the same award: the 2020 Oscar for Visual Effects. Each movie is a masterpiece of computer generated art, from the Avengers’ time travel suits to Star Wars’ chase scenes to the incredible de-aging effects in The Irishman. It’s easy to be awed by these effects - or to not even notice them. So we brought in Niko Pueringer, a visual effects artist from the production studio Corridor Digital, to help us break down the visual magic behind each film. Check out Niko and Corridor’s NOburn channel for more visual effects breakdowns: noburn.infofeatured Like this one, where they re-made visual effects in The Mummy Returns: noburn.info/id/video/sXyUh5p0eIdpgZw.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How to make a movie look like one long shot
How to make a movie look like one long shot
8 måneder siden
The trick to spotting cuts in a “one-take” film. Become a Video Lab member! bit.ly/video-lab The Best Picture nominee 1917 tells a pretty simple story: two British soldiers cross the no man’s land of World War I to warn a battalion of an impending ambush. What really makes the movie stand out is how director Sam Mendes and cinematographer Roger Deakins made the movie look like it was filmed in one continuous take. The techniques required to pull off hidden cuts have their roots in Alfred Hitchcock's movie Rope - and if you look closely, you can catch where they happen in 1917. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: goo.gl/XFrZ5H
amouramarie
amouramarie - Minutt siden
I wonder if someday they'll have sets like this, but the size of an airplane hangar. That would be wild to be in.
Kory Vogel
Kory Vogel - 2 minutter siden
Med school should be strictly merit of skill malpractice is very dangerous
catherine tandar
catherine tandar - 3 minutter siden
thank god, I'm Indonesian, we good at speaking or imitate other languages pronounciation if we learn the languages tho.. lol..
Qurrata A'yun Kamil
Qurrata A'yun Kamil - 5 minutter siden
I got a trouser that has 6 pockets, very comfortable, stylist, from.... the men section
David
David - 5 minutter siden
We could be the third or fourth or fiftieth simulation in the search for one where humans or whatever we are can live forever. At least until the destruction of the universe. Or maybe as elon says, base reality could be really boring, so we gave owerselves a huge empty universe and that's why we haven't had true alien contact. I could just be tripping guys xd
Michal Olender
Michal Olender - 5 minutter siden
Green screen lives matter?
adarsh suck
adarsh suck - 5 minutter siden
When this Boomer Generation ends than there will new GAMERS generation will add in
Ramzo Beanz
Ramzo Beanz - 6 minutter siden
It started with tik tok and slowly led to war, coincidence? I think not
Sydney Williams
Sydney Williams - 7 minutter siden
they need to return all of these artifacts.
Anaya Lopez
Anaya Lopez - 10 minutter siden
2019: *cries* 2020: Whats wrong? 2019: The people hate me 2020: Oh I'll give them something to hate *runs*
SCHOOLTHEWORLD
SCHOOLTHEWORLD - 10 minutter siden
Socialism leads to Tyranny
Cyril Moreno
Cyril Moreno - 10 minutter siden
I hope one day i see them as one
Abhinandan Gunasekaran
Abhinandan Gunasekaran - 12 minutter siden
@paige and holly do watch this..hope it helps paige's demonic side for cracking knucles relax a bit😂😂😂
Roshan kerala
Roshan kerala - 12 minutter siden
USA:This wepons for you.(Iran) This wepons for you (iraq) No compliments😎 let's start. 🔥 *The ultimate viruse of the world* 🔥
SerialMascot
SerialMascot - 12 minutter siden
Vox go home. You're drunk.
cosmic rr
cosmic rr - 13 minutter siden
Time to learn from Asian Cities , Singapore HongKong, Japan. They are amazing in public transit. Public transportation will be tricky tho now with covid.
varun shekhar
varun shekhar - 14 minutter siden
Nobody: Vox: classifying India as a wealthy country.
Jerross Clarito
Jerross Clarito - 14 minutter siden
I won't, i have my reasons, mainly technology wise
Senada Pasic
Senada Pasic - 15 minutter siden
Forcing people to live poverty with no power in the system and then preying on them is terror. No matter who it is.
Pranjal Mundhada
Pranjal Mundhada - 15 minutter siden
What if I go to cuba...🙄🙄
adarsh suck
adarsh suck - 16 minutter siden
lol now i think india handled caste system great
Logan Phillips
Logan Phillips - 16 minutter siden
Compare it to US homeless problem in many cities
CX A340
CX A340 - 16 minutter siden
Except that transit-oriented development also means higher costs of living at a time when cities themselves are emptying out and we are discovering that there is less need for large mass-transit systems when more people are able to move out of the cities and into the suburbs and exurbs to enjoy more wide open space and lower costs of living and the ability to not have to commute to work at all so the future may look more like cities with BRT systems that have trunk lines and simply less cars and buses and trains on the road and on the tracks and lower costs of living as more and more people escape the cities. We do better to just keep building efficient BRT systems to move people.
Joseph Stalin
Joseph Stalin - 18 minutter siden
Clown mask shop owner: Chuckles. I’m in danger
Joseph Stalin
Joseph Stalin - 18 minutter siden
I hate how clowns are now portrayed as murderous killers. They should be entertaining figures of society
NIG NOG NATE
NIG NOG NATE - 18 minutter siden
No such thing as black Wall Street. Quit making up history.
Desiign - JD
Desiign - JD - 19 minutter siden
Wait....in the UK we would say everyone’s an ally. USA is this generations enemy. Travelled for 3 years, same tune across the world from Canada to Sri Lanka.
shuvo hossain
shuvo hossain - 19 minutter siden
wraith of God will be upon you you may not fear anyone, but you must fear God Allahu Akber May Allah guide them
bzacon
bzacon - 20 minutter siden
Transit isn''t the problem, zoning is. If businesses and homes are in the same place, people don't need to drive for everything. Look at southeast Asia? Many less wealthy countries have limited if any transit, but still flourish because the government doesn't interfere with neighborhood markets and street vendors.
Reaper 06
Reaper 06 - 20 minutter siden
People will still find a way you can’t punish all because someone got there dads gun
John Długosz
John Długosz - 20 minutter siden
What's the diameter of the "volume"? (for reference, how big was the rotating platform used in _2001_ ? How does it compare with "Sandy's Disco" built for _Gravity_ ? Where does the camera go, and how do you avoid reflections of the camera and equipment in Mano's armor? That is, is the equipment also using digital active camouflage, shot through a tiny hole in the screen, or what?
Stadium Grand
Stadium Grand - 20 minutter siden
Back to China, we have city wide public transit every 3-5 minutes in peak time, and 10-15 minutes in regular time. A public transit route offers a 20-minute interval would be heavily complained. But you know what, I think China has the most crowded and clogged rapid roads in the world because too much cars together make the roads into giant parking lots anywhere in Chinese cities. Amazing truth is that the buses remain unbelievably crowded, not a bit ease at all. It makes you think all Chinese populations are flooding into only cities, and leaving suburbs into ghost towns. Yet you can find well built ghost towns anywhere in China. This is just another example of funds spent on operations and capital investments.
Demiii G
Demiii G - 21 minutt siden
Snitches get tear gassed 😎
Troy Garcia
Troy Garcia - 21 minutt siden
sad! its the people of the world against all of our corrupt governments...people from every continent, country, island are generally great people...its the governments that cause the hate between people
T W
T W - 22 minutter siden
How am I almost 60 years old and never heard of this? So sad;! 😭
Jazlyn Reyes
Jazlyn Reyes - 22 minutter siden
Thank you for this video! I am striving to become an activist for minority rights, and I have learned so much more about colored people. Never learned about this in school, but they definitely should add this to the curriculum.
FuryToxican
FuryToxican - 24 minutter siden
can we not get political?please? Israel is a really modern and beautiful, while palestine has really nice people.
Donnie mate
Donnie mate - 25 minutter siden
Tbh I can't believe it took this long to come up with this
Reaper 06
Reaper 06 - 27 minutter siden
Man you guys don’t know what you guys are saying at all 😂
Eblees mustafa
Eblees mustafa - 28 minutter siden
Islam is synonyms of terrorism we should defame it for the sake of humanity.
METTA
METTA - 29 minutter siden
y’all in these comments love names, waves and hype.. TOO much, literally crying over 5 seconds of travis
Gourav Sarkar
Gourav Sarkar - 29 minutter siden
Ur map is wrong
Manas Nishad
Manas Nishad - 30 minutter siden
Religion of Hate!!
Moe Ock
Moe Ock - 31 minutt siden
Ana aneek Omak
Vlas Laurentiu
Vlas Laurentiu - 31 minutt siden
It should be a country's decision if it wants imigrants or not. If spain doesn't want the blacks than they shouldn't try to cross illegally. Afterall, the will of a democratic nation is the will of the majority.
BananaCatMatt
BananaCatMatt - 31 minutt siden
Vox is bad at balancing their audio :(
Jawla
Jawla - 32 minutter siden
So we r gonna ignore that a guy is pointing at russia on the world map..okay nevermind
10k Subscribers Without Any Videos Challenge
10k Subscribers Without Any Videos Challenge - 33 minutter siden
These cartoons are good actually and funny.
Tom Fitzgerald
Tom Fitzgerald - 33 minutter siden
Well it got Republicans right
minekache
minekache - 36 minutter siden
Donald trump will be the responsible of the end of humanity
minekache
minekache - 36 minutter siden
Donald trump will be the responsible of the end of humanity
Sean Walter
Sean Walter - 37 minutter siden
Trump turned Dems and Vox into interventionists... he wants a fair deal and the American people deserve it economically. He's right, we've carried these other nations for far too long at a huge cost to our well-being here at home. I can't believe I'm seeing the left cry out for military and foreign spending. Trump has y'all all jacked up.
Magatism
Magatism - 37 minutter siden
If they want our freedom in exchange of alliances, it's time for a reset. US, Russia, UK, Japan, India and other willing democratic countries must form an alliance. This must also include East african federation.
Guntur Hanafi
Guntur Hanafi - 37 minutter siden
I really hate 5 fps macbook camera video
jules george
jules george - 38 minutter siden
This is the person example of what can happen if an immoral person leads the country. When crimes are not prosecuted mobs can commit genocide against groups of people that they're jealous of. They probably called themselves brothers in christ but they were actually brothers of Caine's by their actions.
thegeorgezila
thegeorgezila - 40 minutter siden
" ... Why American public transit is so bad ... " Stupidity and ignorance.
humed omer
humed omer - 41 minutt siden
The one who doesn't fullfil your interests is a threat for western world we need more like him who you don't like
Pink Pasta
Pink Pasta - 42 minutter siden
please stop calling yourself 'indians'.
hulu plus
hulu plus - 42 minutter siden
1:40 lol that old person reference that she didn't get
Shwaj Tajrian
Shwaj Tajrian - 44 minutter siden
if islam is a religion of peace then north korea is a democracy
Albator Dali
Albator Dali - 44 minutter siden
that was borderline autistic
Adit Suryanata
Adit Suryanata - 46 minutter siden
4:34 Google maps is nothing compared to google earth nowadays
Arnold A. Lampel
Arnold A. Lampel - 47 minutter siden
"....in 2020 he pulled 12,000 Troops out of Germany..." No he did not, at least not yet. They are still there.
Thunder Thighs
Thunder Thighs - 47 minutter siden
I want his Job. Vox, I'll work for free just feed me.
Raggin Cajun
Raggin Cajun - 48 minutter siden
So the media lied back then🤔 nothing new they are still lieing now. Even this program is ridiculous they said white man was killing blacks with machine guns? Yeah right no such thing existed in the 1800s.
ForestofTooMuchFood
ForestofTooMuchFood - 48 minutter siden
$15 hour is still poverty
Love Nature
Love Nature - 49 minutter siden
Producer of this video= Indian 😂😂😂
Super Neccessary
Super Neccessary - 49 minutter siden
If you want us to VOTE for biden just say so VOX
crispy
crispy - 49 minutter siden
Depressing, isn't it.
Joseph Stalin
Joseph Stalin - 50 minutter siden
So, if I fly to the other side of the world, the time changes and I time travel?
nesseiht gnay
nesseiht gnay - 50 minutter siden
Trump you lose 2020 done for you. Biden 2020
Thunder Thighs
Thunder Thighs - 52 minutter siden
It's like a Chinatown in steroids
Edrian Thomas Tom
Edrian Thomas Tom - 53 minutter siden
116 Pictures in a 5 minute video
Johnny K
Johnny K - 54 minutter siden
This is just what they want us to see on the surface lol
Justin Akers
Justin Akers - 54 minutter siden
No, it’s not literally gold. If it were literally gold it would be gold, literally.
kardon
kardon - 54 minutter siden
we can learn from Singapore and HK public system. efficient city transport. Singapore has a line that is called a "circle line" efficiently serving the suburb to suburb concept. Check their "MRT" map (:
D K
D K - 56 minutter siden
Might as well just make a video on why America in general is bad...
Rylan Schenck
Rylan Schenck - 57 minutter siden
Personally I don’t believe in evolution because I am a Christian, if you look at everything from trees to dogs to ants to the human eye you can tell there is a creator that made everything there is no way that all of that got created from chance or by mistake if it was made by chance there would be no order everything would just be very weirdly mutated or the world would just be plain chaos I don’t know how people believe this stuff but I’m not forcing anyone to believe the way I do it’s just how I see the world
aditya bagve
aditya bagve - 58 minutter siden
I already do this for my product photography shoots 😅
Shawn S
Shawn S - 58 minutter siden
What % of gloabl warming is caused by natural effects vs human caused effects?